Archaeology Books

  • The Story of the British Isles in 100 Places - Hardback - 9780593079799 - Neil Oliver (Author)
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    This evocative book is written by one of television's best-loved archaeologists and presenters, Neil Oliver. Neil beautifully writes a personal account of what makes the British Isles so special and why he believes it is the best place in the world.

    Told through the places that have witnessed the unfolding of British history, this book begins with the footprints of humankind's earliest ancestors and continues through to the development of religion, the transition of the industrial revolution and the outbreak of two World Wars.

    Stunningly written, Neil's book features majestic recounts of history, spanning from windswept headlands and battlefields to ancient trees and magnificent cathedrals.
  • BMAJR
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    A richly illustrated overview of the current-day knowledge on the textile art of the Nile Valley from the first millennium AD, in response to the 9th conference on 'Textiles from the Nile Valley' in Antwerp of 27-29 October, 2017. This is one of only a handful of books devoted to the textile art of the Late-Roman, Early-Byzantine and Early-Islamic textile art in Egypt. Over 20 essays by specialists elaborate on the pieces of textile art that were found in excavations and museums, and discuss the radiocarbon dating, iconography and weaving techniques demonstrated.
  • AWIAO
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    For more than 4,000 years the pyramids of Giza have stood like giant question marks that have intrigued and endlessly fascinated people. Who exactly built them? When? Why? And how did they create these colossal structures? But the pyramids are not a complete mystery - the stones, the hieroglyphs, the landscape and even the layers of sand and debris hold stories for us to read. Mark Lehner and Zahi Hawass, with over four decades of involvement with Giza, provide their unique and personal insight into the site, bringing together all the information and evidence to create a record unparalleled in its detail and scope. The celebrated Great Pyramid of Khufu, or Cheops, is the only one of the seven wonders of the ancient world still standing, but there is much more to Giza. We may think of the pyramids as rising from the desert, isolated and enigmatic, yet they were surrounded by temples, tombs, vast cemeteries and even teeming towns of the living. All are described in detail here and brought back to life, with hundreds of illustrations including detailed photographs of the monuments, excavations and objects, as well as plans, reconstructions and the latest images from remote-controlled cameras and laser scans. Through the ages, Giza and the pyramids have inspired the most extraordinary speculations and wild theories, but here, finally, in this prestigious publication, is the full story as told by the evidence on the ground, by the leading authorities on the site.
  • BJPAW
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    The third volume of the Le Yaudet excavation reports details the history and archaeology of the site from AD 300 until the present day. The promontory overlooking the estuary of the river Leguer was reoccupied in the late fourth century, possibly by a military detachment from Britain, and thereafter developed as an ecclesiastical site in the fifth to eighth centuries. In the later medieval period it became a village clustered around the chapel. The report presents the archaeological and material evidence for these periods in detail.
  • BGJFB
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    Ivory is a wonderful material: tactile, beautiful, workable into many different forms and the strongest in the animal kingdom. Unfortunately for the elephant, it has been highly prized from the Palaeolithic to the present day, in part by virtue of its rarity and the difficulty of acquiring it. During the early first millennium bc - the 'Age of Ivory' - literally thousands of carved ivories found their way to the Assyrian capital city of Kalhu, or modern Nimrud, in northern Iraq. The majority were not made there, in the heart of ancient Assyria, but arrived as gift, tribute or booty gathered by the Assyrian kings from the small neighbouring states of the ancient Middle Eastern world. The ivories were first unearthed in the mid-19th century by renowned Victorian traveller and adventurer Austen Henry Layard, but it was not until the mid-20th century that the extent of the treasure was realized by Max Mallowan, the archaeologist husband of Agatha Christie. Thousands of extraordinary ivories have since been excavated from the ruins of the ancient city's extravagant palaces, temples and forts. In recent years, many have been destroyed or remain at risk following the invasion of Iraq and the sacking of the Iraq Museum, as well as in the ongoing conflict and destruction of cultural heritage in the region. As a result, the ivories preserved in these pages form a unique and unparalleled record of the otherwise lost art of the Middle East.
  • BRIBT
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    This is the only book about standing stones created by the whole community of megalith enthusiasts, as represented by the archaeologists, photographers, theorists and stones aficionados who post on the Megalithic Portal. It offers unparalleled coverage of Britain and Ireland's Neolithic and Bronze Age sites: where they are, what to look out for, how to understand them. Featuring 750+ sites (500 with full photographic profiles), the book includes many places not covered elsewhere. An introductory essay by archaeologist Vicki Cummings helps readers interpret the sites and surrounding landscape through prehistoric eyes. Throughout the book are feature articles by different contributors on a huge range of topics, from archaeological analysis of key sites (including Stonehenge, Avebury, Durrington Walls, the Dartmoor stone rows, Grimes Graves, the Cumbrian axe factories, Newgrange and many more), reports on cutting-edge excavations at sites such as Must Farm and Ness of Brodgar, as well as discussions of 'mysteries', such as otherworldly experiences, dowsing, healing sites, archaeoastronomy and sacred geometry. Up-to-date archaeological approaches, such as sensory and experimental archaeology, are also explained. Andy Burnham's introduction offers tips for megalith enthusiasts in the field, as well as 'how to' features on drone photography and 3D modelling. With its stunning contemporary design combined with a durable flexi binding, this is a volume to gift and to treasure, to pore over at home and take out on expeditions.
  • AFUYC
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    Building and architecture flourished throughtout the Roman Empire. The Romans discovered new techniques to solve problems but also to impress the world. They built aqueducts to bring water into their cities and towns, grand baths for cleansing and socialising and elaborate villas for the cream of their society. In this book, scientist and archaeologist Tony Rook takes the reader through Roman building techniques. He explores the structures that were found throughout the Roman Empire, including roads, bridges and aqueducts as well as the Romans' answer to under-floor heating - the hypocaust - and vaults, domes, tiles and pipes. Lavishly illustrated with stunning photographs and the author's own detailed line drawings, Roman Building techniques looks at Roman innovations, practices and materials in a thorough yet readable way.
  • AKXGD
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    Organized into six thematic sections, The Great Archaeologists gives short, vivid biographies and fresh assessments of the achievements of 70 of the worlds greatest practitioners, written by a 40-strong team of contributors, themselves all eminent archaeologists and authors. All these archaeologists very different individuals, and often in deep disagreement with one another have established the subject as a scientific discipline and vastly broadened and deepened our knowledge of the human past. Authoritative and entertaining, this is a book for anyone fascinated by the human past and its discovery.
  • BHAOK
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    A new narrative history of the Viking Age, interwoven with exploration of the physical remains and landscapes that the Vikings fashioned and walked: their rune-stones and ship burials, settlements and battlefields. To many, the word 'Viking' brings to mind red scenes of rape and pillage, of marauders from beyond the sea rampaging around the British coastline in the last gloomy centuries before the Norman Conquest. And it is true that Britain in the Viking Age was a turbulent, violent place. The kings and warlords who have impressed their memories on the period revel in names that fire the blood and stir the imagination: Svein Forkbeard and Edmund Ironside, Ivar the Boneless and Alfred the Great, Erik Bloodaxe and Edgar the Pacifier amongst many others. Evidence for their brutality, their dominance, their avarice and their pride is still unearthed from British soil with stunning regularity. This is not, however, the whole story. In Viking Britain, Thomas Williams has drawn on his experience as Project Curator of the major international exhibition Vikings: Life and Legend to show how the people we call Vikings came not just to raid and plunder, but to settle, to colonize and to rule. The impact on these islands was profound and enduring, shaping British social, cultural and political development for hundreds of years. Indeed, in language, literature, place-names and folk-lore, the presence of Scandinavian settlers can still be felt, and their memory - filtered and refashioned through the writings of people like J.R.R. Tolkien, William Morris and G.K.Chesterton - has transformed the western imagination. This remarkable new book draws upon new academic research and first-hand experience, drawing deeply from the relics and landscapes that the Vikings and their contemporaries fashioned and walked: their rune stones and ship burials, settlements and battlefields, poems and chronicles. The book offers a vital evocation of a forgotten world, its echoes in later history and its implications for the present. It is a stunning exploration of Viking Britain by a writer of immense literary power.
  • BGXWC
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    Martin J Smith argues that the study of human remains is the purest, most reliable and unbiased source of evidence for the reality of conflict in the past. He outlines its value to the new science of Battlefield Archaeology and the wider understanding of historical conflict. He outlines the processes used in examining osteological remains to unlock the clues about what the combatants endured. Drawing on case studies spanning the millennia, the author shows how skeletal remains can often tell us, in chilling detail, exactly what a warrior suffered in his final moments (though often the evidence of healed wounds from previous battles is just as striking). This enriches our understanding of the human experience of battle as well as providing scientific data on the effects of various weapons on the human body. This is a book written with scientific rigour by a leading archaeologist but it will appeal equally to students of archaeology and the military historian with an interest in the brutal face of battle.
  • ATIYZ
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    * A band of Nazi archaeologists on a secret mission to Tibet* Others searching for Atlantis the 'home of the Nordic race'* Excavations in Czechoslovakia to find 'Germanic culture'* Sacred Sanskrit texts as keys to Nordic roots and Ancient Indian civilizationDuring the 1930s, in the build up to World War II, the Nazis established a band of specialists, the SS-Ahnenerbe, under the command of Heinrich Himmler and Hermann Wirth. Their aim was nothing less than to prove the superiority of the Aryan race, and with it the unique right of the German people to rule Europe. The occult figured as a key feature in many of these increasingly desperate quack "research" efforts. Part "science," part espionage, and part fantasy. Archaeological expeditions were sent to Iceland, Tibet, Kafiristan, North Africa, Russia, the Far East, Egypt, and even South America and the Arctic.The Nazi "Ancestral Heritage Society's" chief administrator was Dr. Wolfram Sievers, who cruelly conducted medical experiments on prisoners in concentration camps, and was responsible for the looting of historic artefacts considered "Germanic" for "return" to Germany.He rewarded those academics that took part with high military office, whilst those academics who contradicted or criticized the SS-Anenerbe were carted off to concentration camps where they faced certain death. This book tells the true history of the real life villains behind the Indiana Jones movies. Sometimes truth really is stranger than fiction!
  • BPXUP
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    Tutankhamun puts the boy king's short life into context by describing and explaining the complexities of life in Ancient Egypt. Covering the work of earlier Egyptologists, it details the actual discovery and original expedition, drawing on the personal archives of Howard Carter himself. On 26 November 1922, Howard Carter and Lord Carnarvon discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun. The world was entranced. Never before had a tomb been found in such a perfect condition, with all the richness of its contents still intact. The stories that have since grown up around the discovery of the tomb and of the boy king who lay undisturbed for over 3,000 years have become legendary and continue to fire imaginations around the world. This book tells those stories, and uncovers the reality behind them.
  • AWDCX
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    The Book of the Dead of Sobekmose, in the collection of the Brooklyn Museum, New York, is one of the most important surviving examples of the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead genre. Such 'books' - papyrus scrolls - were composed of traditional funerary texts, including magic spells, that were thought to assist a dead person on their journey into the afterlife. The ancient Egyptians believed in an underworld fraught with dangers that needed to be carefully navigated, from the familiar, such as snakes and scorpions, to the extraordinary: lakes of fire to cross, animal-headed demons to pass and, of course, the ritual Weighing of the Heart, whose outcome determined whether or not the deceased would be 'born again' into the afterlife for eternity. This publication is the first to offer a continuous English translation of a single, extensive, major text that can speak to us from beginning to end in the order in which it was composed. The papyrus itself is one of the longest of its kind to come down to us from the New Kingdom, a time when Egypt's international power and prosperity were at their peak. This new translation not only represents a great step forward in the study of these texts, but also grants modern readers a direct encounter with what can seem a remote and alien civilization. With language that is, in many places, unquestionably evocative and very beautiful, it offers a look into the mindset of the ancient Egyptians, highlighting their beliefs and anxieties about this world as well as the next.
  • BRZSK
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    The ancient city of Angkor in Cambodia has fascinated scholars and visitors alike since its rediscovery in the mid-19th century. All are wonderstruck by the beauty and multiplicity of the sculptures that adorn its temples and structures and are overwhelmed by the sheer size of Angkor. There is nothing to equal it in the archaeological world. A great deal was already known about the history of Angkor and the brilliant Khmer civilization that built it thanks to pioneering work by archaeologists and scholars, but our knowledge has now been completely revolutionized by cutting-edge technology. Airborne laser scanning (LiDAR) has revealed entire cities that were previously unknown and a complex urban landscape with highways and waterways, profoundly transforming our interpretations of the development and supposed decline of Angkor. In this comprehensively updated edition of Angkor and the Khmer Civilization, respected archaeologist Michael Coe is joined by Damian Evans, who led this remarkable programme of scientific exploration, to present for the first time in book form the results and implications of these ground-breaking discoveries that are rewriting history.
  • AUPZT
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    Graham Hancock's multi-million bestseller Fingerprints of the Gods remains an astonishing, deeply controversial, wide-ranging investigation of the mysteries of our past and the evidence for Earth's lost civilization. Twenty years on, Hancock returned with the sequel to his seminal work filled with completely new, scientific and archaeological evidence, which has only recently come to light. On the heels of the very successful hardcover edition, Hancock returns with this paperback version including two chapters brimming with recent reporting of fresh scientific advances (ranging from DNA to astrophysics) that substantially support the case. Near the end of the last Ice Age 12,800 years ago, a giant comet that had entered the solar system from deep space thousands of years earlier, broke into multiple fragments. Some of these struck the Earth causing a global cataclysm on a scale unseen since the extinction of the dinosaurs. At least eight of the fragments hit the North American ice cap, while further fragments hit the northern European ice cap. The impacts, from comet fragments a mile wide approaching at more than 60,000 miles an hour, generated huge amounts of heat which instantly liquidized millions of square kilometers of ice, destabilizing the Earth's crust and causing the global Deluge that is remembered in myths all around the world. A second series of impacts, equally devastating, causing further cataclysmic flooding, occurred 11,600 years ago, the exact date that Plato gives for the destruction and submergence of Atlantis. The evidence revealed in this book shows beyond reasonable doubt that an advanced civilization that flourished during the Ice Age was destroyed in the global cataclysms between 12,800 and 11,600 years ago. But there were survivors - known to later cultures by names such as 'the Sages', 'the Magicians', 'the Shining Ones', and 'the Mystery Teachers of Heaven'. They travelled the world in their great ships doing all in their power to keep the spark of civilization burning. They settled at key locations - Gobekli Tepe in Turkey, Baalbek in the Lebanon, Giza in Egypt, ancient Sumer, Mexico, Peru and across the Pacific where a huge pyramid has recently been discovered in Indonesia. Everywhere they went these 'Magicians of the Gods' brought with them the memory of a time when mankind had fallen out of harmony with the universe and paid a heavy price. A memory and a warning to the future...For the comet that wrought such destruction between 12,800 and 11,600 years may not be done with us yet. Astronomers believe that a 20-mile wide 'dark' fragment of the original giant comet remains hidden within its debris stream and threatens the Earth. An astronomical message encoded at Gobekli Tepe, and in the Sphinx and the pyramids of Egypt,warns that the 'Great Return' will occur in our time...
  • BMMOQ
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    A detailed history with fascinating insights and a gorgeous visual reference, this book tours the sacred Egyptian sites, from the impressive mortuary temples of the pharaohs to those dedicated to the many gods and goddesses.It includes an in-depth examination of the crucial role that religious belief and mythology played during this intriguing period of ancient history. The allure of ancient Egypt has endured over many centuries - and this authoritative volume offers further intriguing insights. It delves into the tombs, devoting chapters to the most famous burial sites: Giza, Saqqara and the Valley of the Kings, where the resting place of the boy-king Tutankhamun was discovered. The book also describes Egypt's temples, religions and myths, from the impressive mortuary temples of the pharaohs, such as Ramesses II, to elaborate funerary rituals, offerings and superstitions.With maps, chronologies and artwork supplementing more than 750 photographs, this book captures the essence of a fascinating epoch.
  • BDQAC
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    Where do we find the world's very first art? When, and why, did people begin experimenting with different materials, forms and colours? Were our once-cousins, the Neanderthals, also capable of creating art? Prehistorians have been asking these questions of our ancestors for decades, but only very recently, with the development of cutting-edge scientific and archaeological techniques, have we been able to piece together the first chapter in the story of art. Overturning the traditional Eurocentric vision of our artistic origins, which has focused almost exclusively on the Franco-Spanish cave art, Paul Bahn and Michel Lorblanchet take the reader on a search for the earliest art across the whole world. They show that our earliest ancestors were far from being the creatively impoverished primitives of past accounts, and Europe was by no means the only 'cradle' of art; the artistic impulse developed in the human mind wherever it travelled. The long universal history of art mirrors the development of humanity.
  • BGJIK
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    The Neolithic ('New Stone Age') marks the time when the prehistoric communities of Europe turned their backs on the hunter-gatherer lifestyle that they had followed for many thousands of years, and instead, became farmers. The significance of this switch from a lifestyle that had been based on the hunting and gathering of wild food resources, to one that involved the growing of crops and raising livestock, cannot be underestimated. Although it was a complex process that varied from place to place, there can be little doubt that it was during the Neolithic that the foundations for the incredibly complex modern societies in which we live today were laid. However, we would be wrong to think that the first farming communities of Europe were in tune with nature and each other, as there is a considerable (and growing) body of archaeological data that is indicative of episodes of warfare between these communities. This evidence should not be taken as proof that warfare was endemic across Neolithic Europe, but it does strongly suggest that it was more common than some scholars have proposed. Furthermore, the words of the seventeenth-century English philosopher, Thomas Hobbes, who famously described prehistoric life as 'nasty, brutish, and short', seem rather apt in light of some of the archaeological discoveries from the European Neolithic.
  • BNHCE
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    The Curse of the Pharaoh's Tombs is the definitive book on Ancient Egyptian tomb curses, providing new information and data never before published whilst exploring the many incidents and deaths associated with tomb curses. The book puts the record straight on matters which have been wrongly recorded by others, such as the legend of Tutankhamun, as well as presenting new data never before published associated with matters such as the torment Howard Carter suffered before his death. It also contains exclusive information and interviews with the family members and archaeologists associated with the curses, including experts at the British Museum and Cairo Museum. Paul Harrison also covers the history of Egyptian tomb curses, why they were placed at the entrance to some tombs and not others, as well as the frightening reality of mummification after death in Ancient Egypt. Closer to home, the hundreds of deaths and haunted tube station (Museum) which are associated with the curse of Amen-Ra (housed in the British Museum) is covered along with the mysterious deaths and tragedy associated with Cleopatra's needle on the Embankment of the River Thames.
  • BTEXE
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    This is the first book to survey the 'hidden half' of prehistoric societies as revealed by archaeology - from Australopithecines to advanced Stone Age foragers, from farming villages to the beginnings of civilisation. Prehistoric children can be seen in footprints and finger daubs, in images painted on rocks and pots, in the signs of play and the evidence of first attempts to learn practical crafts. The burials of those who did not reach adulthood reveal clothing, personal adornment, possession and status in society, while the bodies themselves provide information on diet, health and sometimes violent death. This book demonstrates the extraordinary potential for the study of childhood within the prehistoric record, and will suggest to those interested in childhood what can be learnt from the study of the deep past. -- .
  • BRHKU
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    King Arthur's Wars describes one of the biggest archaeological finds of our times; yet there is nothing new to see. There are secrets hidden in plain sight. We speak English today, because the Anglo-Saxons took over most of post-Roman Britain. How did that happen? There is little evidence: not much little archaeology, and even less written history. There is, however, a huge amount of speculation. King Arthur's Wars brings an entirely new approach to the subject. The answers are out there, in the countryside, waiting to be found. Months of field work and map study allow us to understand, for the first time, how the Anglo-Saxons conquered England; county by county and decade by decade. King Arthur's Wars exposes what the landscape and the place names tell us. As a result, we can now know far more about this `Dark Age'. What is so special about Essex? Why is Buckinghamshire an odd shape? Why is the legend of King Arthur so special to us? Why don't Cumbrian farmers use English numbers, when they count sheep? Why don't we know where Camelot was? Why did the Romano-British stop eating oysters? King Arthur's Wars tells that story.
  • AHVNB
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    The Mediterranean has been for millennia one of the global cockpits of human endeavour. World-class interpretations exist of its Classical and subsequent history, but there has been remarkably little holistic exploration of how its societies, culture and economies first came into being, despite the fact that almost all the fundamental developments originated well before 500 bc. This book is the first full, interpretive synthesis for a generation on the rise of the Mediterranean world from its beginning, before the emergence of our own species, up to the threshold of Classical times. Extensively illustrated and ranging across disciplines, subject matter and chronology from early humans and the origins of farming and metallurgy to the rise of civilizations Egyptian, Levantine, Hispanic, Minoan, Mycenaean, Phoenician, Etruscan, early Greek the book is a masterpiece of archaeological and historical writing.
  • AHDJB
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    The author, Stan Beckensall, has lived and worked in Northumberland for thirty-five years and this is first and foremost an insider's book. The outstanding natural beauty and distinctive geology of the county, and its rich archaeology and history, are seen through a series of case studies. When layers of time are peeled from these special places, the result is a microcosm of the county, captured in prose and poetry, photographs from the air and ground, and paintings and drawings by his friends. Beckensall's theme is that some places generate powerful feelings because of what has happened there, some as they are striking or beautiful, others due to an indefinable attraction or quality. There are famous sites that delight visitors: Berwick, Holy Island, Hadrian's Wall and the Cheviots. There are also lesser known places such as Old Berwick and Edlingham where the author has made significant discoveries, and others like Ford and Etal, which have a particular significance on the author. Another dimension is his work on the significance of place names and field names. Northumberland: A Celebration is written from the heart as well being firmly rooted in original research for the author's extensive experience as a teacher, lecturer and dramatist has given him a unique insight into people's lives in both town and country areas.
  • BGRJN
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    Stretching 73 miles from coast to coast and reaching a height of about 13 feet, Hadrian's Wall should have been counted as one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. Today, a World Heritage site, it stands as the most imposing monument north of the Alps and attracts millions of visitors a year. Yet, despite all the excavation and research that has been carried out, this is the first detailed guide to be written for many years. Having first dealt with the practical questions of transport, clothing and maps, Guy de la Bedoyere explains why and how the Wall was constructed. With the help of almost 100 sketch maps, drawings and photographs, he then conducts the visitor, stage by stage, along the full length of the Wall, providing map locations, route and parking instructions, details of access and opening times, and a full account of everything that can be seen. He also covers the outpost forts, the forts and settlements to the rear (South Shields, Corbridge and Vindolanda) and the local museums which house so many of the artefacts discovered along the Wall. This indispensable guide-book concludes with a list of dates, a glossary and a summary of all the key sources.