History

Archaeology Books

  • AXLKZ
    Richard Stillwell
    • £308.70
    • RRP £324.95
    • Save £16.25
    Here are over 1,000 pages of authoritative information on the archaeology of Greek and Roman civilization. The sites discussed in the more than 2,800 entries are scattered from Britain to India and from the shores of the Black Sea to the coast of North Africa and up the Nile. They are located on sixteen area maps, keyed to the entries. The entries were written by 375 scholars from sixteen nations, many of whom have worked at the sites they describe. Until now our knowledge of the Classical period has been scattered in hundreds of sources dating from antiquity to our own times. This volume provides essential information on work accomplished, in progress, and still to be undertaken. Originally published in 1976. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
  • BMAJR
    Antoine De Moor
    • £134.99
    • RRP £150.00
    • Save £15.01
    A richly illustrated overview of the current-day knowledge on the textile art of the Nile Valley from the first millennium AD, in response to the 9th conference on 'Textiles from the Nile Valley' in Antwerp of 27-29 October, 2017. This is one of only a handful of books devoted to the textile art of the Late-Roman, Early-Byzantine and Early-Islamic textile art in Egypt. Over 20 essays by specialists elaborate on the pieces of textile art that were found in excavations and museums, and discuss the radiocarbon dating, iconography and weaving techniques demonstrated.
  • AWIAO
    Zahi A. Hawass
    • £60.00
    • RRP £75.00
    • Save £15.00
    For more than 4,000 years the pyramids of Giza have stood like giant question marks that have intrigued and endlessly fascinated people. Who exactly built them? When? Why? And how did they create these colossal structures? But the pyramids are not a complete mystery - the stones, the hieroglyphs, the landscape and even the layers of sand and debris hold stories for us to read. Mark Lehner and Zahi Hawass, with over four decades of involvement with Giza, provide their unique and personal insight into the site, bringing together all the information and evidence to create a record unparalleled in its detail and scope. The celebrated Great Pyramid of Khufu, or Cheops, is the only one of the seven wonders of the ancient world still standing, but there is much more to Giza. We may think of the pyramids as rising from the desert, isolated and enigmatic, yet they were surrounded by temples, tombs, vast cemeteries and even teeming towns of the living. All are described in detail here and brought back to life, with hundreds of illustrations including detailed photographs of the monuments, excavations and objects, as well as plans, reconstructions and the latest images from remote-controlled cameras and laser scans. Through the ages, Giza and the pyramids have inspired the most extraordinary speculations and wild theories, but here, finally, in this prestigious publication, is the full story as told by the evidence on the ground, by the leading authorities on the site.
  • BJPAW
    • £53.60
    • RRP £67.00
    • Save £13.40
    The third volume of the Le Yaudet excavation reports details the history and archaeology of the site from AD 300 until the present day. The promontory overlooking the estuary of the river Leguer was reoccupied in the late fourth century, possibly by a military detachment from Britain, and thereafter developed as an ecclesiastical site in the fifth to eighth centuries. In the later medieval period it became a village clustered around the chapel. The report presents the archaeological and material evidence for these periods in detail.
  • BGJFB
    Georgina Herrmann
    • £32.00
    • RRP £40.00
    • Save £8.00
    Ivory is a wonderful material: tactile, beautiful, workable into many different forms and the strongest in the animal kingdom. Unfortunately for the elephant, it has been highly prized from the Palaeolithic to the present day, in part by virtue of its rarity and the difficulty of acquiring it. During the early first millennium bc - the 'Age of Ivory' - literally thousands of carved ivories found their way to the Assyrian capital city of Kalhu, or modern Nimrud, in northern Iraq. The majority were not made there, in the heart of ancient Assyria, but arrived as gift, tribute or booty gathered by the Assyrian kings from the small neighbouring states of the ancient Middle Eastern world. The ivories were first unearthed in the mid-19th century by renowned Victorian traveller and adventurer Austen Henry Layard, but it was not until the mid-20th century that the extent of the treasure was realized by Max Mallowan, the archaeologist husband of Agatha Christie. Thousands of extraordinary ivories have since been excavated from the ruins of the ancient city's extravagant palaces, temples and forts. In recent years, many have been destroyed or remain at risk following the invasion of Iraq and the sacking of the Iraq Museum, as well as in the ongoing conflict and destruction of cultural heritage in the region. As a result, the ivories preserved in these pages form a unique and unparalleled record of the otherwise lost art of the Middle East.
  • AKXGD
    Brian Fagan
    • £19.89
    • RRP £24.95
    • Save £5.06
    Organized into six thematic sections, The Great Archaeologists gives short, vivid biographies and fresh assessments of the achievements of 70 of the worlds greatest practitioners, written by a 40-strong team of contributors, themselves all eminent archaeologists and authors. All these archaeologists very different individuals, and often in deep disagreement with one another have established the subject as a scientific discipline and vastly broadened and deepened our knowledge of the human past. Authoritative and entertaining, this is a book for anyone fascinated by the human past and its discovery.
  • BHAOK
    Tom Williams
    • £20.00
    • RRP £25.00
    • Save £5.00
    A new narrative history of the Viking Age, interwoven with exploration of the physical remains and landscapes that the Vikings fashioned and walked: their rune-stones and ship burials, settlements and battlefields. To many, the word 'Viking' brings to mind red scenes of rape and pillage, of marauders from beyond the sea rampaging around the British coastline in the last gloomy centuries before the Norman Conquest. And it is true that Britain in the Viking Age was a turbulent, violent place. The kings and warlords who have impressed their memories on the period revel in names that fire the blood and stir the imagination: Svein Forkbeard and Edmund Ironside, Ivar the Boneless and Alfred the Great, Erik Bloodaxe and Edgar the Pacifier amongst many others. Evidence for their brutality, their dominance, their avarice and their pride is still unearthed from British soil with stunning regularity. This is not, however, the whole story. In Viking Britain, Thomas Williams has drawn on his experience as Project Curator of the major international exhibition Vikings: Life and Legend to show how the people we call Vikings came not just to raid and plunder, but to settle, to colonize and to rule. The impact on these islands was profound and enduring, shaping British social, cultural and political development for hundreds of years. Indeed, in language, literature, place-names and folk-lore, the presence of Scandinavian settlers can still be felt, and their memory - filtered and refashioned through the writings of people like J.R.R. Tolkien, William Morris and G.K.Chesterton - has transformed the western imagination. This remarkable new book draws upon new academic research and first-hand experience, drawing deeply from the relics and landscapes that the Vikings and their contemporaries fashioned and walked: their rune stones and ship burials, settlements and battlefields, poems and chronicles. The book offers a vital evocation of a forgotten world, its echoes in later history and its implications for the present. It is a stunning exploration of Viking Britain by a writer of immense literary power.
  • BGXWC
    Martin Smith
    • £20.00
    • RRP £25.00
    • Save £5.00
    Martin J Smith argues that the study of human remains is the purest, most reliable and unbiased source of evidence for the reality of conflict in the past. He outlines its value to the new science of Battlefield Archaeology and the wider understanding of historical conflict. He outlines the processes used in examining osteological remains to unlock the clues about what the combatants endured. Drawing on case studies spanning the millennia, the author shows how skeletal remains can often tell us, in chilling detail, exactly what a warrior suffered in his final moments (though often the evidence of healed wounds from previous battles is just as striking). This enriches our understanding of the human experience of battle as well as providing scientific data on the effects of various weapons on the human body. This is a book written with scientific rigour by a leading archaeologist but it will appeal equally to students of archaeology and the military historian with an interest in the brutal face of battle.
  • ATIYZ
    David Barrowclough
    • £20.00
    • RRP £25.00
    • Save £5.00
    * A band of Nazi archaeologists on a secret mission to Tibet* Others searching for Atlantis the 'home of the Nordic race'* Excavations in Czechoslovakia to find 'Germanic culture'* Sacred Sanskrit texts as keys to Nordic roots and Ancient Indian civilizationDuring the 1930s, in the build up to World War II, the Nazis established a band of specialists, the SS-Ahnenerbe, under the command of Heinrich Himmler and Hermann Wirth. Their aim was nothing less than to prove the superiority of the Aryan race, and with it the unique right of the German people to rule Europe. The occult figured as a key feature in many of these increasingly desperate quack "research" efforts. Part "science," part espionage, and part fantasy. Archaeological expeditions were sent to Iceland, Tibet, Kafiristan, North Africa, Russia, the Far East, Egypt, and even South America and the Arctic.The Nazi "Ancestral Heritage Society's" chief administrator was Dr. Wolfram Sievers, who cruelly conducted medical experiments on prisoners in concentration camps, and was responsible for the looting of historic artefacts considered "Germanic" for "return" to Germany.He rewarded those academics that took part with high military office, whilst those academics who contradicted or criticized the SS-Anenerbe were carted off to concentration camps where they faced certain death. This book tells the true history of the real life villains behind the Indiana Jones movies. Sometimes truth really is stranger than fiction!
  • AWDCX
    P. F. O'Rourke
    • £19.96
    • RRP £24.95
    • Save £4.99
    The Book of the Dead of Sobekmose, in the collection of the Brooklyn Museum, New York, is one of the most important surviving examples of the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead genre. Such 'books' - papyrus scrolls - were composed of traditional funerary texts, including magic spells, that were thought to assist a dead person on their journey into the afterlife. The ancient Egyptians believed in an underworld fraught with dangers that needed to be carefully navigated, from the familiar, such as snakes and scorpions, to the extraordinary: lakes of fire to cross, animal-headed demons to pass and, of course, the ritual Weighing of the Heart, whose outcome determined whether or not the deceased would be 'born again' into the afterlife for eternity. This publication is the first to offer a continuous English translation of a single, extensive, major text that can speak to us from beginning to end in the order in which it was composed. The papyrus itself is one of the longest of its kind to come down to us from the New Kingdom, a time when Egypt's international power and prosperity were at their peak. This new translation not only represents a great step forward in the study of these texts, but also grants modern readers a direct encounter with what can seem a remote and alien civilization. With language that is, in many places, unquestionably evocative and very beautiful, it offers a look into the mindset of the ancient Egyptians, highlighting their beliefs and anxieties about this world as well as the next.
  • BFZIE
    Christopher Dunn
    • £16.80
    • RRP £21.00
    • Save £4.20
    From the pyramids in the north to the temples in the south, ancient artisans left their marks all over Egypt, unique marks that reveal craftsmanship we would be hard pressed to duplicate today. Drawing together the results of more than 30 years of research and nine field study journeys to Egypt, Christopher Dunn presents a stunning stone-by-stone analysis of key Egyptian monuments, including the statue of Ramses II at Luxor and the fallen crowns that lay at its feet. His modern-day engineering expertise provides a unique view into the sophisticated technology used to create these famous monuments in prehistoric times. Using modern digital photography, computer-aided design software, and metrology instruments, Dunn exposes the extreme precision of these monuments and the type of advanced manufacturing expertise necessary to produce them. His computer analysis of the statues of Ramses II reveals that the left and right sides of the faces are precise mirror images of each other, and his examination of the mysterious underground tunnels of the Serapeum illuminates the finest examples of precision engineering on the planet. Providing never-before-seen evidence in the form of more than 280 photographs, Dunn's research shows that while absent from the archaeological record, highly refined tools, techniques, and even mega-machines must have been used in ancient Egypt.
  • BDMNI
    John Man
    • £16.00
    • RRP £20.00
    • Save £4.00
    Since the time of the ancient Greeks we have been fascinated by accounts of the Amazons, an elusive tribe of hard-fighting, horse-riding female warriors. Equal to men in battle, legends claimed they cut off their right breasts to improve their archery skills and routinely killed their male children to purify their ranks. For centuries people believed in their existence and attempted to trace their origins. Artists and poets celebrated their battles and wrote of Amazonia. Spanish explorers, carrying these tales to South America, thought they lived in the forests of the world's greatest river, and named it after them. In the absence of evidence, we eventually reasoned away their existence, concluding that these powerful, sexually liberated female soldiers must have been the fantastical invention of Greek myth and storytelling. Until now. Following decades of new research and a series of groundbreaking archeological discoveries, we now know these powerful warrior queens did indeed exist. In Amazons, John Man travels to the grasslands of Central Asia, from the edge of the ancient Greek world to the borderlands of China, to discover the truth about the warrior women mythologized as Amazons. In this deeply researched, sweeping historical epic, Man redefines our understanding of the Amazons and their culture, tracking the ancient legend into the modern world and examining its significance today.
  • BGJIK
    Julian Maxwell Heath
    • £15.99
    • RRP £19.99
    • Save £4.00
    The Neolithic ('New Stone Age') marks the time when the prehistoric communities of Europe turned their backs on the hunter-gatherer lifestyle that they had followed for many thousands of years, and instead, became farmers. The significance of this switch from a lifestyle that had been based on the hunting and gathering of wild food resources, to one that involved the growing of crops and raising livestock, cannot be underestimated. Although it was a complex process that varied from place to place, there can be little doubt that it was during the Neolithic that the foundations for the incredibly complex modern societies in which we live today were laid. However, we would be wrong to think that the first farming communities of Europe were in tune with nature and each other, as there is a considerable (and growing) body of archaeological data that is indicative of episodes of warfare between these communities. This evidence should not be taken as proof that warfare was endemic across Neolithic Europe, but it does strongly suggest that it was more common than some scholars have proposed. Furthermore, the words of the seventeenth-century English philosopher, Thomas Hobbes, who famously described prehistoric life as 'nasty, brutish, and short', seem rather apt in light of some of the archaeological discoveries from the European Neolithic.
  • BMMTL
    Bonechi
    • £15.99
    • RRP £19.99
    • Save £4.00
    * 170 colour photographs, and 20 reconstructions * A story of Pompeii, the eyewitness account of Pliny in AD 70 * Eruption of Vesuvius and the devastation caused, and the incredible preservation of the City, and the lava & ash. * A guide for the tourist to view the dwellings, paintings, roads, and buildings as a time capsule.
  • BNHCE
    Paul Harrison
    • £15.99
    • RRP £19.99
    • Save £4.00
    The Curse of the Pharaoh's Tombs is the definitive book on Ancient Egyptian tomb curses, providing new information and data never before published whilst exploring the many incidents and deaths associated with tomb curses. The book puts the record straight on matters which have been wrongly recorded by others, such as the legend of Tutankhamun, as well as presenting new data never before published associated with matters such as the torment Howard Carter suffered before his death. It also contains exclusive information and interviews with the family members and archaeologists associated with the curses, including experts at the British Museum and Cairo Museum. Paul Harrison also covers the history of Egyptian tomb curses, why they were placed at the entrance to some tombs and not others, as well as the frightening reality of mummification after death in Ancient Egypt. Closer to home, the hundreds of deaths and haunted tube station (Museum) which are associated with the curse of Amen-Ra (housed in the British Museum) is covered along with the mysterious deaths and tragedy associated with Cleopatra's needle on the Embankment of the River Thames.
  • BOIXT
    Bonechi
    • £15.99
    • RRP £19.99
    • Save £4.00
    Discover Egypt's rich history, monument and artwork with this beautiful volume. Its detailed texts and superb historical and artistic illustrations and maps provide an overview of the fascinating masterpieces of the country. Illustrations are various. Photographic, Line drawings of tomb furniture, reconstructions and the Classic art of David Roberts are all included. Archaeological discoveries at the Pyramids, Karnak and Aswan feature strongly. The importance of the Nile, its fertility and the Delta area which make Egypt so unique in the ancient world.
  • BDQAC
    Paul Bahn
    • £15.96
    • RRP £19.95
    • Save £3.99
    Where do we find the world's very first art? When, and why, did people begin experimenting with different materials, forms and colours? Were our once-cousins, the Neanderthals, also capable of creating art? Prehistorians have been asking these questions of our ancestors for decades, but only very recently, with the development of cutting-edge scientific and archaeological techniques, have we been able to piece together the first chapter in the story of art. Overturning the traditional Eurocentric vision of our artistic origins, which has focused almost exclusively on the Franco-Spanish cave art, Paul Bahn and Michel Lorblanchet take the reader on a search for the earliest art across the whole world. They show that our earliest ancestors were far from being the creatively impoverished primitives of past accounts, and Europe was by no means the only 'cradle' of art; the artistic impulse developed in the human mind wherever it travelled. The long universal history of art mirrors the development of humanity.
  • AHVNB
    Cyprian Broodbank
    • £31.09
    • RRP £34.95
    • Save £3.86
    The Mediterranean has been for millennia one of the global cockpits of human endeavour. World-class interpretations exist of its Classical and subsequent history, but there has been remarkably little holistic exploration of how its societies, culture and economies first came into being, despite the fact that almost all the fundamental developments originated well before 500 bc. This book is the first full, interpretive synthesis for a generation on the rise of the Mediterranean world from its beginning, before the emergence of our own species, up to the threshold of Classical times. Extensively illustrated and ranging across disciplines, subject matter and chronology from early humans and the origins of farming and metallurgy to the rise of civilizations Egyptian, Levantine, Hispanic, Minoan, Mycenaean, Phoenician, Etruscan, early Greek the book is a masterpiece of archaeological and historical writing.
  • AHDJB
    Stan Beckensall
    • £15.19
    • RRP £18.99
    • Save £3.80
    The author, Stan Beckensall, has lived and worked in Northumberland for thirty-five years and this is first and foremost an insider's book. The outstanding natural beauty and distinctive geology of the county, and its rich archaeology and history, are seen through a series of case studies. When layers of time are peeled from these special places, the result is a microcosm of the county, captured in prose and poetry, photographs from the air and ground, and paintings and drawings by his friends. Beckensall's theme is that some places generate powerful feelings because of what has happened there, some as they are striking or beautiful, others due to an indefinable attraction or quality. There are famous sites that delight visitors: Berwick, Holy Island, Hadrian's Wall and the Cheviots. There are also lesser known places such as Old Berwick and Edlingham where the author has made significant discoveries, and others like Ford and Etal, which have a particular significance on the author. Another dimension is his work on the significance of place names and field names. Northumberland: A Celebration is written from the heart as well being firmly rooted in original research for the author's extensive experience as a teacher, lecturer and dramatist has given him a unique insight into people's lives in both town and country areas.
  • AZNPC
    Robert M. Schoch
    • £15.19
    • RRP £18.99
    • Save £3.80
    In this provocative collaboration from two Egyptology outsiders, Robert M. Schoch, Ph.D., and Robert Bauval combine their decades of research to show how the Sphinx is thousands of years older than the conventional Egyptological timeline and was built by a long forgotten pre-Pharaonic civilization. They examine the known history of the Sphinx, contrasting what Egyptologists claim with prominent historical accounts and new research, including updates to Schoch's geological water weathering research and reanalysis of seismic studies. Building on Bauval's Orion Correlation Theory, they investigate the archaeoastronomical alignments of the monuments of the Giza Plateau and reveal how the pyramids and Sphinx were built to align with the constellations of Orion and Leo. Analyzing the evidence for a significantly older construction phase at Giza and the restoration and recarving of the Sphinx during the Old Kingdom era, they assert that the Sphinx was first built by an advanced pre-Pharaonic civilization that existed circa 12,000 years ago on the Giza Plateau, contemporaneous with the sophisticated Gobekli Tepe complex.
  • AWOJQ
    Douglas Preston
    • £15.19
    • RRP £18.99
    • Save £3.80
    Since the days of conquistador Hernan Cortes, rumours have circulated about a lost city of immense wealth hidden deep in the Honduran interior. Indigenous tribes speak of ancestors who fled there to escape the Spanish invaders, and warn the legendary city is cursed: to enter it is a death sentence. They call it the Lost City of the Monkey God. In 1940, swashbuckling journalist Theodore Morde returned from the rainforest with hundreds of artifacts and an electrifying story of having found the City - but then committed suicide without revealing its location. Three quarters of a century later, bestselling author Doug Preston joined a team of scientists on a groundbreaking new quest. In 2012 he climbed aboard a single-engine plane carrying a highly advanced, classified technology that could map the terrain under the densest rainforest canopy. In an unexplored valley ringed by steep mountains, that flight revealed the unmistakable image of a sprawling metropolis, tantalizing evidence of not just an undiscovered city but a lost civilization. To confirm the discovery, Preston and the team battled torrential rains, quickmud, plagues of insects, jaguars, and deadly snakes. They emerged from the jungle with proof of the legend...and the curse. They had contracted a horrifying, incurable and sometimes lethal disease. Suspenseful and shocking, filled with history, adventure and dramatic twists of fortune, THE LOST CITY OF THE MONKEY GOD is the absolutely true, eyewitness account of one of the great discoveries of the twenty-first century.
  • BLXVR
    Adrian Goldsworthy
    • £15.19
    • RRP £18.99
    • Save £3.80
    Located at the far-flung and wild edge of the Roman Empire, Hadrian's Wall was constructed by Emperor Hadrian in the 120s AD. Vast in size and stretching from the east to the west cost of the province of Britannia, it took ten years and thousands of hands to build the seventy-three miles of wall and its impressive forts. Perhaps the greatest physical reminder and monument of Roman Britain, the remnants of the wall are still visible on the uplands of Cumbria and Northumberland, and it is one of the most visited heritage sites in the country. Adrian Goldsworthy considers why and how the Vallum Aelium was built and discusses the fascinating history, afterlife and archaeology of this unique ancient monument. The Landmark Library is a testament to the achievements of mankind from the late stone age to the present day. Each volume is handsomely illustrated with 25,000 words devoted to a crucial theme in the history of civilization.
  • AJYBQ
    Robin Dunbar
    • £15.16
    • RRP £18.95
    • Save £3.79
    When and how did the brains of our hominin ancestors become human minds? When and why did our capacity for language or art, music and dance evolve? It is the contention of this pathbreaking and provocative book that it was the need for early humans to live in ever-larger social groups, and to maintain social relations over ever-greater distances the ability to think big that drove the enlargement of the human brain and the development of the human mind. This social brain hypothesis, put forward by evolutionary psychologists such as Robin Dunbar, one of the authors of this book, can be tested against archaeological and fossil evidence, as archaeologists Clive Gamble and John Gowlett show in the second part of Thinking Big. Along the way, the three authors touch on subjects as diverse and diverting as the switch from finger-tip grooming to vocal grooming or the crucial importance of making fire for the lengthening of the social day. Ultimately, the social worlds we inhabit today can be traced back to our Stone Age ancestors.
  • ATHVZ
    J.P. Mallory
    • £15.16
    • RRP £18.95
    • Save £3.79
    Following his account of Irish origins as evidenced by archaeology, genetics and linguistics, J. P. Mallory returns to the subject to interrogate what he calls the 'Irish Dreamtime': the native Irish retelling of their own origins, as related by medieval manuscripts. He attempts to explore the reality of this version of the earliest history of Ireland, which places apparently 'mythological' events on a concrete timeline of invasions, colonizations and royal reigns that extends even further back in time than the history of Classical Greece. Can the accounts of this 'Dreamtime' really inform us of the way of life in Iron Age Ireland? By comparing the world depicted in the earliest Irish literary tradition with the archaeological evidence available on the ground, Mallory explores Ireland's rich mythological tradition and tests its claims to represent reality.