History Through the Ages

Medieval History Books

  • Terry Deary's Dangerous Days Collection - 3 Books - Collection - 9781407250625 - Terry Deary
    TDDD
    • £4.99
    • RRP £25.97
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    • Just £1.66 per book
    With his dark sense of humour and accessible writing style, Terry Deary is one of the nation's favourite children's authors but in this very adult collection he introduces adults to the most shocking secrets of the Roman Empire, Elizabethan England and the Victorian Railways.

    From how the Romans (the first 'civilised' society, remember...) made human killing a sport to the lack of safety on the rails, there are so many shocking facts to absorb and gasp over...

    Please note these books contain strong language.
  • RELM
    Dan Jones
    • £6.99
    • RRP £20.00
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    Written by Dan Jones, the bestselling author of The Plantagenets, Realm Divided outlines events during one transformative year of the thirteenth century.

    An astonishing read for anyone interested in history, it will show you exactly what happened in 1215 - the year when King John agreed to pace his seal on the Magna Carta. An event that set England on its slow march towards a fully representative democracy, this was also the year that the Capetians began to show their dominance in France and that Pope Innocent III's Fourth Lateran Council decisions affected the lives of millions.

    From royal court to peasant wedding, this book provides an accessible portrait of medieval English society.
  • AGIN
    Sir Ranulph Fiennes, Bt OBE
    • £3.99
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    For centuries, many of Sir Ranulph Fiennes' ancestors were key players for both sides in the turbulent Anglo-French relationship. In this book, the much-loved explorer reveals how they affected one of the most significant turning points in our history.

    It's now over 600 years since the Battle of Agincourt and this book brings a personal and authoritative voice to the proceedings. On 25 October 1415, four men from the English army sheltered from the rain and prepared for battle - they were all English knights and all Ran's ancestors. Across the valley, four of Ran's ancestors from France were confident that Dauphin's army would win the day.

    This highly readable book finds Sir Ranulph examining one of the bloodiest periods in medieval history in detail, providing details on the battle plans, weaponry and human drama of Agincourt. A must-read for any historian!
  • King John: Treachery, Tyranny and the Road to the Magna Carta - Hardback - 9780091954239 - Marc Morris
    KGJN
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    The 800th anniversary of Magna Carta made headlines across the world in 2015 and this biography provides a compelling portrait of King John, the supposed tyrant leader who issued - and consequently rejected - the famous document that bound him and his successors to better behaviour.

    Extensively researched and written by Marc Morris, author of A Great and Terrible King and The Norman Conquest, the book examines whether King John was the familiar figure we all know from Robin Hood - a monarch who was greedy, cowardly, despicable and cruel.

    Throughout the book, the historian draws on contemporary chronicles and the king's own letters to show what John was really like. He argues he was dynamic, inventive and relentless, but also a very flawed individual whose rise to power involved treachery, rebellion and murder.

    The book also looks at the invasions by Wales, Scotland and Ireland that occurred under John's reign and the civil war and foreign invasion that brought upon his downfall.
  • RIII
    David Horspool
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    Have we bought into the view of Richard III as the personification of evil as publicised by the likes of William Shakespeare, or should we believe he was a much-maligned monarch, warrior and statesman as claimed by the Richard III Society?

    In this riveting and fascinating biography, historian David Horspool provides an insight into the life and times of a flawed king whose story has endured and intrigued for so many years.

    From his birth and upbringing towards the climax of the War of the Roses through to what happened to the princes in the tower and even his reburial in Leicester in 2015, this book sheds light on the mysteries that have blighted one of England's most enigmatic and elusive kings.
  • AVKVS
    John Speed
    • £24.00
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    A stunning new edition of the earliest atlas of the British Isles. Britain's Tudor Maps: County by County reproduces the maps of John Speed's 1611 collection The Theatre of Great Britaine in large, easy-to-read format for the first time. Compiled from 1596, these richly detailed maps show each county of Great Britain individually and as they existed at the time, complete with a wealth of heraldic decoration, illustrations and royal portraits. With an introduction by the bestselling author Nigel Nicholson, each map is presented alongside a fascinating commentary by Alasdair Hawkyard, elaborating on both the topographical features and the social conditions of each county at the time, enabling an examination of how the physical and social landscape has been transformed over time.
  • AVGRN
    Hugh Bicheno
    • £24.00
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    THE REAL GAME OF THRONES CONTINUES...Blood Royal is the second volume of a magisterial new interpretation of the savage struggle for supreme power between and within the Plantagenet houses of Lancaster and York from 1450 until 1485. It is a story of closely interwoven families riven by ambition, hatred and treachery, told in chapters narrating the points of view of the key players in England's longest and bloodiest civil war. Battle Royal ended with the Lancastrian cause crushed and the Yorkist usurper Edward IV firmly established on the throne. Blood Royal details the renewed and chronic instability sparked by Edward's humiliation of Duchess Cecily, his imperious mother, and her nephew the Neville double earl known to history as 'Warwick the Kingmaker', by secretly marrying the beautiful commoner Elizabeth Woodville. In her fury Duchess Cecily tells her sons George of Clarence and Richard of Gloucester that Edward, who is totally unlike them, is the product of her adultery and not their father's heir. Edward's brief overthrow in 1470-71, the execution of Clarence in 1478 and the usurpation and murder of Edward's young sons by Richard of Gloucester in 1483 all followed from that poisonous revelation. Readers may judge that the 331-year-old Plantagenet dynasty came to a fitting end with the death of Richard on Bosworth Field in 1485, to be replaced by the Tudors and a vigorous new era in English history.
  • AUWLG
    Michael Jones
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    As a child he was given his own suit of armour; in 1346, at the age of 16 he helped defeat the French at Crecy; and in 1356 he captured the king of France at Poitiers. For the chronicler Jean Froissart 'He was the flower of all chivalry'; for the Chandos Herald, who fought with him on all his campaigns, he was 'the embodiment of all valour'. Edward of Woodstock, eldest son and heir of Edward III of England, better known as 'the Black Prince', was England's pre-eminent military leader during the first phase of the Hundred Years War. Michael Jones uses a wide range of chronicle and documentary material, including the Prince's own letters and those of his closest followers, to bring to life the dramatic and powerful story of the life and times of 'the Black Prince', and to paint a memorable portrait of warfare and society in the tumultuous fourteenth century.
  • AUGLS
    Carl Fredrik Sverdrup
    • £23.96
    • RRP £29.95
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    The Mongols created the greatest landlocked empire known to history. It was an empire created and sustained by means of conquest. Initially an insignificant tribal leader, Genghis Khan gradually increased his power, overcoming one rival after another. After he had subjugated all tribes of Inner Asia, he struck southward into China and later attacked distant Khwarizm in the Near East. Sube'etei continued to make significant conquests after Genghis Khan died, conquering central China and leading a large force into the heart of Europe. Between them, Genghis Khan and Sube'etei directed more than 40 campaigns, fought more than 60 battles, and conquered all lands from Korea in the east to Hungary and Poland in the west. This book offers a detailed narrative of the military operations of these two leaders, based on early Mongolian, Chinese, Near Eastern, and European sources. Making full use of Chinese sourced not translated properly into any European language, the account offer details never before given in English works. Detailed maps showing the operations support the text. Many conventional wisdom views of the Mongols, such as their use of terror as a deliberate strategy, or their excellence at siege warfare, are shown to be incorrect. This is a major contribution to our knowledge of the Mongols and their way of warfare.
  • AYLVJ
    Dayanna Knight
    • £19.89
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    How was the North Atlantic settled? How did the distinct cultures of medieval Iceland and Greenland come to be? Viking Nations is an interdisciplinary consideration of medieval North Atlantic settlement that focuses on not only site-related identity but also the active choices made to adopt elements of identity. It utilizes comparative analysis of evidence to highlight terrestrial and marine drivers to identity development in relation to the site context. By adopting this approach it is possible to more closely examine not only the settlement of the North Atlantic but also the apparent taming of the Vikings concurrently taking place. This book illustrates the priorities expressed by medieval settling populations in relation to particular contexts. It proposes a method for planning ships' cargos which corresponds to identity development amongst the constituent Atlantic archipelagos. This work is written for an educated audience desiring to know more about the medieval North Atlantic beyond Viking stereotypes. Enough detail is included that medieval specialists will also enjoy the book.
  • AZXOG
    John Carr
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    The Eastern Roman or 'Byzantine' Empire had to fight for survival throughout its long history so military ability was a prime requisite for a successful Emperor. John Carr concentrates on the personal and military histories of the more capable war fighters to occupy the imperial throne at Constantinople. They include men like it's founder Constantine I, Julian, Theodosius, Justinian, Heraclius, Leo I, Leo III, Basil I, Basil II (the Bulgar-slayer), Romanus IV Diogenes, Isaac Angelus, and Constantine XI. Byzantium's emperors, and the military establishment they created and maintained, can be credited with preserving Rome's cultural legacy and, from the seventh century, forming a bulwark of Christendom against aggressive Islamic expansion. For this the empire's military organization had to be of a high order, a continuation of Roman discipline and skill adapted to new methods of warfare. Thus was the Empire, under the leadership of its fighting emperors, able to endure for almost a thousand years after the fall of Rome.
  • AZYST
    David Santiuste
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    Known to posterity as Scottorum Malleus - the Hammer of the Scots - Edward I was one of medieval England's most formidable rulers. In this meticulously researched new history, David Santiuste offers a fresh interpretation of Edward's military career, with a particular focus on his Scottish wars. This is in part a study of personality: Edward was a remarkable man. His struggles with tenacious opponents - including Robert the Bruce and William Wallace - have become the stuff of legend. There is a clear and perceptive account of important military events, notably the Battle of Falkirk, but the narrative also encompasses the wider impact of Edward's campaigns. Edward attempted to mobilize resources - including men, money and supplies - on an unprecedented scale. His wars affected people at all levels of society, throughout the British Isles. David Santiuste builds up a vivid and convincing description of Edward's campaigns in Scotland, whilst also exploring the political background. Edward emerges as a man of great conviction, who sought to bend Scotland to his will, yet also, on occasion, as a surprisingly beleaguered figure.Edward is presented here as the central character in a turbulent world, as commander and king.
  • AWKOR
    Gideon Brough
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    Owain Glyn Dwr is one of the great figures of Welsh and military history. Initially a loyal subject of the king of England, he reluctantly took up arms against the Crown he had served. Once committed to rebellion, he proved surprisingly talented at leading rebel troops against a theoretically vastly superior enemy. Not solely a warrior, he conceived and implemented a strategy which saw his small, poorly-equipped forces repeatedly defeat Crown troops and bring down the apparatus of governance in Wales. Following these achievements, he held native parliaments and established diplomatic contact with surrounding powers. This led to a treaty with France, after the conclusion of which, he welcomed French forces to Welsh soil to campaign with the rebels. In brief, Owain erected a rebel state and won international recognition. Owain's foreign support was fractured by the intrigues of exceptionally talented English diplomats at work in the French court. This created an environment which allowed Crown forces to concentrate on defeating the rebellion in Wales.Although ultimately unsuccessful, Owain emerges from the era as a gifted and honourable leader, giving the Welsh a figure commonly recalled as a hero.
  • AZQPM
    Johannes Fried
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    Since the fifteenth century, when humanist writers began to speak of a "middle" period in history linking their time to the ancient world, the nature of the Middle Ages has been widely debated. Across the millennium from 500 to 1500, distinguished historian Johannes Fried describes a dynamic confluence of political, social, religious, economic, and scientific developments that draws a guiding thread through the era: the growth of a culture of reason.Beginning with the rise of the Franks, Fried uses individuals to introduce key themes, bringing to life those who have too often been reduced to abstractions of the medieval "monk" or "knight." Milestones encountered in this thousand-year traversal include Europe's political, cultural, and religious renovation under Charlemagne; the Holy Roman Empire under Charles IV, whose court in Prague was patron to crowning cultural achievements; and the series of conflicts between England and France that made up the Hundred Years' War and gave to history the enduringly fascinating Joan of Arc. Broader political and intellectual currents are examined, from the authority of the papacy and impact of the Great Schism, to new theories of monarchy and jurisprudence, to the rise of scholarship and science.The Middle Ages is full of people encountering the unfamiliar, grappling with new ideas, redefining power, and interacting with different societies. Fried gives readers an era of innovation and turbulence, of continuities and discontinuities, but one above all characterized by the vibrant expansion of knowledge and an understanding of the growing complexity of the world.
  • AVKCQ
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    An Archaeological Study of the Bayeux Tapestry provides a unique re-examination of this famous piece of work through the historical geography and archaeology of the tapestry. Trevor Rowley is the first author to have analysed the tapestry through the landscapes, buildings and structures shown, such as towns and castles, while comparing them to the landscapes, buildings, ruins and earthworks which can be seen today. By comparing illustrated extracts from the tapestry to historical and contemporary illustrations, maps and reconstructions Rowley is able to provide the reader with a unique visual setting against which they are able to place the events on the tapestry. This approach allows Rowley to challenge a number of generally accepted assumptions regarding the location of several scenes in the tapestry, most controversially suggesting that William may never have gone to Hastings at all. Finally, Rowley tackles the missing end of the tapestry, suggesting the places and events which would have been depicted on this portion of William's journey to Westminster.
  • BKHJB
    Liza Picard
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    In CHAUCER'S PEOPLE, Liza Picard guides us through the tumultuous world of the late fourteenth century in an ingenious, informative and entertaining way. Through the assorted cast of pilgrims Chaucer selected for THE CANTERBURY TALES, Picard brings medieval social history to life and uncovers the detail behind Chaucer's poetic portraits. These are the lives lived beyond the court circles frequented by most of his well-heeled audience. Chaucer chose his pilgrims carefully. He sometimes raises a thought-provoking query in an apparently simple portrait. The Prioress was a sweet, pretty, well-mannered young nun; what was she doing on the road to Canterbury with a mixed band of men, instead of staying in her convent to pray? The Knight was 'a very perfect gentle knight'; but why had his military service landed him in such distant places as Lithuania and Spain? By providing these characters with a three-dimensional framework - the times in which they lived - Liza Picard opens up the fourteenth-century world to us.Drawing on contemporary experiences of a vast range of subjects including war, trade, religion, plague and banking, Liza Picard recreates the medieval world in all its glorious detail.
  • BHAPW
    Dan Jones
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    The Knights Templar were the wealthiest, most powerful - and most secretive - of the military orders that flourished in the crusading era. Their story - encompassing as it does the greatest international conflict of the Middle Ages, a network of international finance, a swift rise in wealth and influence followed by a bloody and humiliating fall - has left a comet's tail of mystery that continues to fascinate and inspire historians, novelists and conspiracy theorists.
  • BOHDJ
    Peter Spring
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    John Tiptoft, Earl of Worcester, is arguably the most intriguing, controversial and possibly misunderstood figure of the Wars of the Roses period. Politically adept, he occupied a string of important offices, first under the Lancastrian Henry VI and then the Yorkist Edward IV. A man of action, he held commands on both and sea, in England, Ireland and Wales. As Constable of England he acted as Edward's enforcer and earned the sobriquet 'Butcher of England' for his beheadings and impalements. Yet he was also an outstanding Renaissance scholar who studied at Oxford, Padua and Ferrara, a collector of books and patron. This, in conjunction with his political actions, makes him a proto-Machiavellian Prince. Peter Spring also looks beyond the Earl's public life to glean insights into the man himself, concluding that the available information generally reveals an attractive personality. He presents a balanced reappraisal, seeing him, as did many contemporary Europeans and some fellow countrymen, as a man of great intellect and capability who did not shirk the hard tasks imposed by a merciless age. Worcester's execution for the application of Roman law, lampooned as the 'laws of Padua', demonstrated the danger of indentification with continental influences in an England increasingly defining itself???through common law, Parliament, and soon religion???against Europe. The contemporary denigration of his character by little Englander chroniclers reflected a deepening antipathy towards the cosmopolitan ??? a recurring trait in the English character ??? perhaps re-emerging with Brexit.
  • BMMCZ
    WB Bartlett
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    Whilst Richard I is one of medieval England's most famous kings he is also the most controversial. He has variously been considered a great warrior but a poor king, a man driven by the quest for fame and glory but also lacking in self-discipline and prone to throwing away the short-term advantages that his military successes brought him. In this reassessment W. B. Bartlett looks at his deeds and achievements in a new light. The result is a compelling new portrait of `the Lionheart' which shows that the king is every bit as remarkable as his medieval contemporaries found him to be. This includes his Muslim enemies, who spoke of him as their most dangerous and gallant opponent. It shows him to be a man badly let down by some of those around him, especially his brother John and the duplicitous French king Philip. The foibles of his character are also exposed to the full, including his complicated relationships with the key women in his life, especially the imposing contemporary figure of his mother, Eleanor of Aquitaine, and his wife, Berengaria, with whom he failed to produce an heir, leading to later suggestions of homosexuality. This is a new Richard, one for the twenty-first century, and a re-evaluation of the life story of one of the greatest personalities of medieval Europe.
  • BOOCE
    Jack Hartnell
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    Dripping with blood and gold, fetishized and tortured, gateway to earthly delights and point of contact with the divine, forcibly divided and powerful even beyond death, there was no territory more contested than the body in the medieval world. In Medieval Bodies, art historian Jack Hartnell uncovers the complex and fascinating ways in which the people of the Middle Ages thought about, explored and experienced their physical selves. In paintings and reliquaries that celebrated the - sometimes bizarre - martyrdoms of saints, the sacred dimension of the physical left its mark on their environment. In literature and politics, hearts and heads became powerful metaphors that shaped governance and society in ways that are still visible today. And doctors and natural philosophers were at the centre of a collision between centuries of sophisticated medical knowledge, and an ignorance of physiology as profound as its results were gruesome. Like a medieval pageant, this striking and unusual history brings together medicine, art, poetry, music, politics, cultural and social history and philosophy to reveal what life was really like for the men and women who lived and died in the Middle Ages. Medieval Bodies is published in association with Wellcome Collection.
  • BOLVZ
    John Ashdown-Hill
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    Wife to Richard, Duke of York, mother to Edward IV and Richard III, and aunt to the famous 'Kingmaker', Richard, Earl of Warwick, Cecily Neville was a key player on the political stage of fifteenth-century Britain England. Mythologically rumoured to have been known as 'the Rose of Raby' because of her beauty and her birth at Raby Castle, and as 'Proud Cis' because of her vanity and fiery temper, Cecily's personality and temperament have actually been highly speculated upon. In fact, much of her life is shrouded in mystery. Putting aside Cecily's role as mother and wife, who was she really? Matriarch of the York dynasty, she navigated through a tumultuous period and lived to see the birth of the future Henry VIII. From seeing the house of York defeat their Lancastrian cousins; to witnessing the defeat of her own son, Richard III, at the battle of Bosworth, Cecily then saw one of her granddaughters become Henry VII's queen consort. Her story is full of controversy and the few published books on her life are full of guess-work. In this highly original history, Dr John Ashdown-Hill seeks to dispel the myths surrounding Cecily using previously unexamined contemporary sources.
  • AOGCZ
    Charles D. Stanton
    • £20.19
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    Following the fall of Rome, the sea is increasingly the stage upon which the human struggle of western civilization is played out. In a world of few roads and great disorder, the sea is the medium on which power is projected and wealth sought. Yet this confused period in the history of maritime warfare has rarely been studied - it is little known and even less understood. Charles Stanton uses an innovative and involving approach to describe this fascinating but neglected facet of European medieval history. He depicts the development of maritime warfare from the end of the Roman Empire to the dawn of the Renaissance, detailing the wars waged in the Mediterranean by the Byzantines, Muslims, Normans, Crusaders, the Italian maritime republics, Angevins and Aragonese as well as those fought in northern waters by the Vikings, English, French and the Hanseatic League. This pioneering study will be compelling reading for everyone interested in medieval warfare and maritime history.
  • BPMKV
    Nigel Rodgers
    • £18.39
    • RRP £22.99
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    The Colosseum in Rome impressed the world when completed in 80AD, continued to impress throughout the Middle Ages and Renaissance, and still does so today. If it is still Rome's greatest landmark, an unfailing magnet for tourists, it is also a brilliant example of Roman technology at its most sophisticated, a smooth-running machine in stone, cement and marble that for centuries staged Rome's lavish if brutal entertainments. This book investigates its construction, its workings and history, including its recent triumphant restoration.
  • BMLNL
    Charles Phillips
    • £18.39
    • RRP £22.99
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    An illustrated, behind the scenes look at medieval castles and how they combined two purposes, a weapon of war and a home for an entire community. Using the beautiful construction of a medieval castle at Guedelon as the starting point for each chapter, the book takes each section of the building itself to explain its design, construction and how it was used and lived in. Using images and techniques learned at the site, step-by-step photographs reveal the ancient skills of stone working, carpentry, dying, rope making, milling and many more, while the text discusses the similarities with other impressive medieval castles from the same period.