Historical Map & Geography Books

  • MPSH
    • £10.99
    • RRP £25.00
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    This visual exploration of the time in which William Shakespeare lived is filled with jaw-dropping facts and observations. It considers what The Bard was like as a man and covers the cultural changes that took place during his lifetime - 1564-1616.

    From the time of the Tudors to Elizabeth I's reign and the first of the Stuart kings, this book reflects the political changes that were reflected in his works and explains how he worked through maps and illustrations to look at how powerful people viewed their positions in the world.

    Author Jeremy Black also explores the locations of Shakespeare's plays and examines the reasons why he chose to set them in these locations.
  • WTHI
    (1)
    • £3.99
    • RRP £9.99
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    I Never Knew That About London author Christopher Winn takes you on a series of walks through central London that will open your eyes to the events that happened in the city during the Victorian era.

    Among the little-known facts he reveals are the 300-foot bell tower at the Houses of Parliament; a hidden chapel in Bloomsbury that was described by Oscar Wilde as 'the most delightful private chapel in London'; and the best Victorian loos in the world that are located near Old Street.
  • LMOD
    • £7.99
    • RRP £20.00
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    3 December 1976 - London learns that pigs really can fly as Pink Floyd's inflatable mascot breaks free from Battersea Power Station
    For the past few years, Canadian-born, London-based artist Mychael Barratt has been tweeting jaw-dropping facts about London's history on a daily basis and this keepsake book has one for every day of the year.

    Based around events and characters that have lived in or affected the famous city, you will learn when the first bowler hat was created and when the Cenotaph on Whitehall was unveiled.

    This is a light-hearted look at London for any fact lover.
  • AOWTA
    • £38.40
    • RRP £48.00
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    The attack on London between 1939 and 1945 is one of the most significant events in the citys modern history, the impact of which can still be seen in its urban and social landscapes. As a key record of the attack, the London County Council Bomb Damage Maps represent destruction on a huge scale, recording buildings and streets reduced to smoke and rubble. The full set of maps is made up of 110 hand-coloured 1:2500. Ordnance Survey base sheets originally published in 1916 but updated by the LCC to 1940. Because they use the 1916 map, they give us a glimpse of a lost London, before post-war redevelopment schemes began to shape the modern city. The colouring applied to the maps records a scale of damage to Londons built environment during the war the most detailed and complete survey of destruction caused by the aerial bombardment. A clear and fascinating introduction by expert Laurence Ward sets the maps in the full historical context of the events that gave rise to them, supported by archival photographs and tables of often grim statistics.
  • AVXIJ
    • £32.00
    • RRP £40.00
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    The 20th century was a period of profound political, social and technological change. Population growth and movement, revolutions in transportation and communication, and the onset of the digital age meant that life would never be the same. It is impossible to overstate the significance of maps, which crept into everyday life during this period. They were both unsung heroes and unreliable witnesses capable of informing but also misleading. They are always subjective, and always worthy of interrogation. Highlights of this global study include a trench-map of the Somme battlefields, a bomb damage map of London, early maps of the ocean floor, a poster showing Mao studying a map on his Long March and a Russian moon globe from 1961. Other maps discussed here include: the United Nations flag, the first stamps of Independent Latvia (1918) printed on the backs of maps, and a motorway sign. As well as sheet maps and atlases, the book gathers models, stamps, medals, manuscripts, printed books, embroidery and photographs. The book also examines changes in mapping technology, from the land surveys of 1900 to the development of satellite imagery by 2000."
  • BPITG
    • £32.00
    • RRP £40.00
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    In June 1944 the Allies opened the long-awaited second front against Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, and this was to be the start of a long struggle throughout Western Europe for the Allied forces in the face of stiff German resistance. The European Theatre was where the bulk of the Allied forces were committed in the struggle against Nazi Germany. It saw some of the most famous battles and operations of the war - Normandy, Market Garden, the Battle of the Bulge - as the Allies sought to liberate Western Europe in the face of bitter and hard-fought German resistance. From the beaches of D-Day through to the final battles in war-ravaged Germany, the war across the breadth and depth of Western Europe is brought to life through scores of carefully researched and intricately detailed maps.
  • BUXHM
    • £28.00
    • RRP £35.00
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    The city: a place of hopes and dreams, destruction and conflict, vision and order. The first city atlas, the Civitates Orbis Terrarum, was published by Braun and Hogenburg in 1572 for the armchair traveller interested in a world that was opening up around him. Since then our fascination with foreign cities has not abated. This sumptuous volume looks at the development of the mapping and representation of the city revealing how we organize the urban space. From skyline profiles, bird's eye views and panoramas, to the schematic maps of transport networks and road layouts to help us navigate, and statistical maps that can provide information on human aspirations, cities can reveal themselves in many ways. Focusing on key points in the development of urban representation and including visions of the future of how we would be living today, this enlightening book illustrates some of the oldest, youngest, liveliest, and most contested cities in the world. Each map has a purpose and its design reflects this. Extended captions explain its relevance and elegance. For anyone interested in the city in which they live or with the desire to explore the history and culture of a metropolis overseas, this book is an enlightening companion.
  • BQYNM
    • £24.00
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    'Visually stunning...it's gone straight to the top of my Christmas present list.' The Bookseller 'I remember how well I liked to turn the pages of my childhood atlas and travel the world to find out where countries and cities were. But there was never anything about why the maps were created - or who drew them. Theatre of the World was my big chance to tell the stories of all those men and women map makers whose amazing work deserves to be celebrated.' Thomas Reinertsen Berg Beautifully illustrated and rich in detail, Theatre of the World reignites our curiosity with the world both ancient and modern. Before you could just put finger to phone to scroll Google Maps, in advance of the era of digital mapping and globes, maps were being constructed from the ideas and questions of pioneering individuals. From visionary geographers to heroic explorers, from the mysterious symbols of the Stone Age to the familiar navigation of Google Earth, Thomas Reinertsen Berg examines the fascinating concepts of science and worldview, of art and technology, power and ambitions, practical needs and distant dreams of the unknown.
  • BRIVA
    • £24.00
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    Ever since humans began to live together in settlements they have felt the need to organise some kind of defence against potentially hostile neighbours. Many of the earliest city states were built as walled towns, and during the medieval era, stone castles were built both as symbols of the defenders' strength and as protection against potential attack. The advent of cannon prompted fortifications to become lower, denser and more complex, and the forts of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries could appear like snowflakes in their complexity and beautiful geometry. Without forts, the history of America could have taken a very different course, pirates could have sailed the seas unchecked, and Britain itself could have been successfully invaded. This book explains the history of human fortifications, and is beautifully illustrated using photographs, plans, drawings and maps to explain why they were built, their various functions and their immense historical legacy in laying the foundations of empire.
  • BQZZK
    • £24.00
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    The most beautiful Victorian maps of England's counties and cities - in large format - by one of Britain's great cartographer's Thomas Moule. Thomas Moule was one of the finest Victorian mapmakers and is regarded as the true follower of John Speed in the cartographic history of Britain. Moule's beautifully observed county and city maps present a minutely detailed record of 19th-century England. They were first published in collectable parts between 1830 and 1837 and then published together in the extensive 2-volume masterwork The English Counties Delineated. Moule celebrated the `ancientness' and history of each county by including pastoral or monument views within the maps, all framed by cartouches, festoons and architectural ornament in a variety of historical styles. But underpinning this ancient vision is the hand of the British Industrial Revolution. Moule's maps are deeply informed by the early technical work of the Ordnance Survey and record the unstoppable growth of the major cities and the unrelenting spread of the railways. The maps have remained influential and highly collectable as both originals and as reproductions. For the first time in a generation this new large-format volume, comprising 55 county and city maps, presents the main body of Thomas Moule's work alongside his original detailed text descriptions. The book's Introduction explains Moule's career as a writer and antiquary and sets his celebrated maps in the context of the technical cartographic revolution in which they were published. The book examines the wide-ranging artistic and cultural influences exhibited as Moule combines accurate cartography with highly decorative architectural frames and evocative, Romantic, pastoral views of the England he so cherished. In doing so it positions him alongside his fellow celebrated Victorian pioneers, including George Virtue, William Westall, Walter Scott, Charles Dickens, JMW Turner, Augustus Pugin, Edward Stanford and George Bradshaw.
  • BRZTJ
    Tom Harper
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    The British Library's map collection is the national cartographic collection of Britain and numbers around four million maps dating from 15 CE to 2017 CE. These include road maps drawn for 13th century pilgrims and sea charts for 17th-century pirates. They include the first printed map to show the Americas and the last to show English-controlled Calais. They include the world's biggest and smallest atlases. They include maps for kings and queens, popes, ministers, schoolchildren, soldiers, tourists. There are maps which changed the world. As well as comprehensively showcasing the varied and surprising treasures of the British Library's "banquet of maps" for the first time, this book will examine the evolution of humanity's perceptions of the world through maps. By looking at how this map collection was assembled principally over two and a half centuries but in reality over a millennium, the book comprises a cartographic history of the world, as well as vivid celebration of the world's best map collection's best maps.
  • BSYUV
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    Created for map lovers by map lovers, this book explores the intriguing stories behind maps across history and illuminates how the ancient art of cartography still thrives today. In this visually stunning book, award-winning journalists Betsy Mason and Greg Miller--authors of the National Geographic cartography blog "All Over the Map"--explore the intriguing stories behind maps from a wide variety of cultures, civilizations, and time periods. Based on interviews with scores of leading cartographers, curators, historians, and scholars, this is a remarkable selection of fascinating and unusual maps--some never before published. This diverse compendium includes ancient maps of dragon-filled seas, elaborate maps of hidden worlds from inside Earth to outer space, devious maps created by spies, and cutting-edge data-based cartography showing the ebb and flow of modern cities. If your brain craves maps--and Mason and Miller would say it does, whether you know it or not--this eye-opening visual feast will inspire and delight.
  • BTZLU
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    In our modern day and age, when satellite imagery and GPS services like Google Maps, offer strikingly accurate images of the world, we can easily forget that for most of human history the world was an unknown tabula rasa on which cartographers, scientists, men of god, and kings imprinted their own dreams and ideals. This new extended edition, with the addition of about 15 maps, explores changing perceptions of the world map through the centuries and across multiple vastly different cultures. We will juxtapose 18th century Buddhist cartography in Japan with European mercantile maps of the same period. We will travel with speculative cartographers and they argue in the scientific academies of Paris, London, and St. Petersburg over theories about what `must' fill the great unknown. We will observe the emergence of the modern world view through the cartographic lens. We will see how, much like reading a long lost childhood diary, old maps are touching earnest reminders that our former selves' knowledge and perception of the world are rich and limited at the same time.
  • BUUEF
    • £24.00
    • RRP £30.00
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    In our modern day and age, when satellite imagery and GPS services like Google Maps, offer strikingly accurate images of the world, we can easily forget that for most of human history the world was an unknown tabula rasa on which cartographers, scientists, men of god, and kings imprinted their own dreams and ideals. This new extended edition, with the addition of about 15 maps, explores changing perceptions of the world map through the centuries and across multiple vastly different cultures. We will juxtapose 18th century Buddhist cartography in Japan with European mercantile maps of the same period. We will travel with speculative cartographers and they argue in the scientific academies of Paris, London, and St. Petersburg over theories about what `must' fill the great unknown. We will observe the emergence of the modern world view through the cartographic lens. We will see how, much like reading a long lost childhood diary, old maps are touching earnest reminders that our former selves' knowledge and perception of the world are rich and limited at the same time.
  • BSJDC
    • £22.40
    • RRP £28.00
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    This comprehensive atlas delves into the cartographic history of WWII: naval, land, and aerial attacks from the invasion of Poland to Pearl Harbor and the Battle of the Bulge. Rare maps include a detailed Germany & Approaches map used by Allied forces in the final stages of the war, full large-scale wartime maps of the world used by President Roosevelt, and crucial Pacific theater maps used by B-17 pilots. Satellite data renders terrain as never before seen, highlighting countries and continents in stunning detail to include the towns, cities, provinces, and transportation roads for a pinpoint-accurate depiction of army movements and alliances. Gripping wartime stories from these hallowed fields of battle, along with photographs, sketches, confidential documents, and artifacts color the rest of this timeless and informative book. This definitive, lavishly illustrated book features an astonishing array of vintage and newly created maps, rare photographs, covert documents, and eyewitness accounts that illuminate the world's greatest conflict.
  • BAJMJ
    • £34.89
    • RRP £39.95
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    300 stunning maps from all periods and from all around the world, exploring and revealing what maps tell us about history and ourselves. Map: Exploring the World brings together more than 300 fascinating maps from the birth of cartography to cutting-edge digital maps of the twenty-fist century. The book's unique arrangement, with the maps organized in complimentary or contrasting pairs, reveals how the history of our attempts to make flat representations of the world has been full of beauty, ingenuity and innovation. Selected by an international panel of curators, academics and collectors, the maps reflect the many reasons people make maps, such as to find their way, to assert ownership, to record human activity, to establish control, to encourage settlement, to plan military campaigns or to show political power. The selection includes the greatest names in cartography, such as James Cook, Gerard Mercator, Matthew Fontaine Maury and Phyllis Pearsall, as well as maps from indigenous cultures around the world, rarely seen maps from lesser known cartographers, and maps of outstanding beauty and surprising individuality from the current generation of map makers.
  • BIKGI
    • £19.99
    • RRP £24.99
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    Spanning many centuries, all continents and the realms of outer space and the imagination, this collection of 138 unique graphics combines beautiful full-colour illustrations with quirky statistics and smart social commentary. The result is a distinctive illustrated guide to the world. Brimming with trivia, deadpan humour and idiosyncratic lore, Strange Maps is a fascinating tour of all things weird and wonderful in the world of cartography.
  • BSIQU
    • £20.00
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    The Golden Atlas is a spectacular visual history of exploration and cartography, a treasure chest of adventures from the chronicles of global discovery, illustrated with a selection of the most beautiful maps ever created. The book reveals how the world came to be known, featuring a magnificent gallery of exceptionally rare hand-coloured antique maps, paintings and engravings, many of which can only be found in the author's collection. Arranged chronologically, the reader is taken on a breathtaking expedition through Ancient Babylonian geography and Marco Polo's journey to the Mongol Khan on to buccaneers ransacking the Caribbean and the voyages of seafarers such as Captain Cook and fearless African pathfinders. Their stories are told in an engaging and compelling style, bringing vividly to life a motley collection of heroic explorers, treasure-hunters and death-dealing villains - all of them accompanied by eye-grabbing illustrations from rare maps, charts and manuscripts. The Golden Atlas takes you back to a world of darkness and peril, placing you on storm-lashed ships, frozen wastelands and the shores of hostile territories to see how the lines were drawn to form the shape of the modern world. The author's previous book, The Phantom Atlas, was a critically acclaimed international bestseller, described by Jonathan Ross as 'a spectacular, enjoyable and eye-opening read' and this new book is sure to follow suit.
  • BTLDV
    • £20.00
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    Asia's history has been shaped by its waters. In Unruly Waters, historian Sunil Amrith reimagines Asia's history through the stories of its rains, rivers, coasts, and seas--and of the weather-watchers and engineers, mapmakers and farmers who have sought to control them. Looking out from India, he shows how dreams and fears of water shaped visions of political independence and economic development, provoked efforts to reshape nature through dams and pumps, and unleashed powerful tensions within and between nations. Today, Asian nations are racing to construct hundreds of dams in the Himalayas, with dire environmental impacts; hundreds of millions crowd into coastal cities threatened by cyclones and storm surges. In an age of climate change, Unruly Waters is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand not only Asia's past but its future.
  • BUIID
    • £20.00
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    Julia Blackburn has always collected things that hold stories about the past, especially the very distant past: mammoth bones, little shells that happen to be two million years old, a flint shaped as a weapon long ago. Time Song brings many such stories together as it tells of the creation, the existence and the loss of a country now called Doggerland, a huge and fertile area that once connected the entire east coast of England with mainland Europe, until it was finally submerged by rising sea levels around 5000 BC. Blackburn mixes fragments from her own life with a series of eighteen `songs' and all sorts of stories about the places and the people she meets in her quest to get closer to an understanding of Doggerland. She sees the footprints of early humans fossilised in the soft mud of an estuary alongside the scattered pockmarks made by rain falling eight thousand years ago. She visits a cave where the remnants of a Neanderthal meal have turned to stone. In Denmark she sits beside Tollund Man who seems to be about to wake from a dream, even though he has lain in a peat bog since the start of the Iron Age. Time Song reveals yet again, that Julia Blackburn is one of the most original writers in Britain, with each of its pages bringing a surprise, an epiphany, a phrase of such beauty and simple profundity you can only gasp.
  • AIDAI
    • £30.49
    • RRP £35.00
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    'Portolan charts', so called from the Italian adjective portolano, meaning 'related to ports or harbours', were born during the 12th century in the maritime community. These charts, drawn on parchment and crisscrossed with lines referring to the compass directions, indicated the succession of ports and anchorages along the shores, and were used by European sailors exploring the world up until the 18th century. Not only used as navigational instruments on boats, they were also produced for wealthy sponsors in the form of illuminated images of the world, to illustrate the economic and political interests of the major European sea powers. This book takes stock of the state of knowledge on these maps, bringing together contributions from a dozen European specialists, who trace the history and diversity of styles and places of production of these charts. This type of mapping is approached from three angles. The first part, 'The Mediterranean', refers to the manufacture and use of the first charts, centered on the Mediterranean, and the persistence of this tradition in the Mediterranean basin until the 18th century. The second part, 'The Open Sea', shows how these regional charts have evolved from a technical and iconographical point of view at the time of the great European voyages, in order to include the oceans and new worlds. The third part, 'The Indian Ocean', shows how these charts, in a maritime area where ancient civilizations coexisted, were dependent on other cartographic traditions (ancient, Arab, Asian) before joining the information reported by Portuguese sailors and European trading companies in the modern era.
  • AFDXW
    • £25.89
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    Over the past 2000 years London has developed from a small town, fitting snugly within its walls, into one of the world's largest and most dynamic cities. This book illustrates and helps to explain the transformation. Side-by-side with the great, semi-official but sanitised images of the whole city, there are the more utilitarian maps and plans of the parts - actual and envisaged - which perhaps present a more truthful picture. But the maps and panoramas are far more than topographical records. They all have something unique to say about them concerns, assumptions, ambitions and prejudices of Londoners at the time when they were created. The book reveals the 'inside story' behind one of the world's greatest cities.
  • AXGJK
    • £25.89
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    Discover some of the great archival treasures of the Royal Geographical Society. Some of the greatest expeditions are described and illustrated with maps, photographs and illustrations by official artists and photographers, and members of the expedition teams. The book also includes the first travellers, who set off with sketchbook or camera, as well as diplomats who chose to explore the wider regions into which they were posted. These men and women provided Westerners with the first images of Northern Arabia, China and Nepal, and South America. They record the attempts to summit the world's highest mountain and reach the polar extremes. For anyone with a love of adventure, this book will be an informative journey and a visual delight.
  • BMDZH
    • £16.00
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    The Debatable Land was an independent territory which used to exist between Scotland and England. At the height of its notoriety, it was the bloodiest region in Great Britain, fought over by Henry VIII, Elizabeth I and James V. After the Union of the Crowns, most of its population was slaughtered or deported and it became the last part of the country to be brought under the control of the state. Today, its history has been forgotten or ignored.When Graham Robb moved to a lonely house on the very edge of England, he discovered that the river which almost surrounded his new home had once marked the Debatable Land's southern boundary. Under the powerful spell of curiosity, Robb began a journey - on foot, by bicycle and into the past - that would uncover lost towns and roads, reveal the truth about this maligned patch of land and result in more than one discovery of major historical significance.Rich in detail and epic in scope, The Debatable Land takes us from a time when neither England nor Scotland could be imagined to the present day, when contemporary nationalism and political turmoil threaten to unsettle the cross-border community once more. Writing with his customary charm, wit and literary grace, Graham Robb proves the Debatable Land to be a crucial, missing piece in the puzzle of British history.Includes a 16-page colour plate section.