Historical Events & Topics

Historical Map & Geography Books

  • Tales from the Captain's Log - Hardback - 9781472948663 - The National Archives
    The National Archives
    • £9.99
    • RRP £25.00
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    From Captain James Cook's notes of his discovery of the South Pacific and Australia to archive logs, diaries and letters that cover naval battles including Trafalgar and Waterloo, this fantastically presented book provides a glimpse into history's greatest nautical voyages.

    From the National Archives, the commanders' journals cover everything from exploring unknown lands to engaging in war and general trade and provide breathtaking descriptions of all the incredible things these seafarers saw on their travels.

    Armchair historians will find accounts of attempts to stop piracy in the Caribbean, notes about newly discovered exotic plants and animals and medical reports of those who sailed. This keepsake book also features maps, drawings and facsimile documents that were found alongside the logs in the archives.
  • LMOD
    Mychael Barratt
    • £7.99
    • RRP £20.00
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    3 December 1976 - London learns that pigs really can fly as Pink Floyd's inflatable mascot breaks free from Battersea Power Station
    For the past few years, Canadian-born, London-based artist Mychael Barratt has been tweeting jaw-dropping facts about London's history on a daily basis and this keepsake book has one for every day of the year.

    Based around events and characters that have lived in or affected the famous city, you will learn when the first bowler hat was created and when the Cenotaph on Whitehall was unveiled.

    This is a light-hearted look at London for any fact lover.
    Hayden Lorimer
    • £96.00
    • RRP £120.00
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    This volume of Geographers Biobibliographical Studies brings together essays on four Frenchmen, a Czech, and three Englishmen. The lives of our subjects extend from the late Enlightenment and the era of 'polite science' in Regency Britain to the first decade of the 21st century. These geographers and their studies are linked not only in their regional expertise - from Brazil, French Indo-China to Scandinavia and South Africa - but also by their commitment to the development of geography as a science and as a discipline. Here, in different settings and at different times, we can see how the lived experience of geographers' lives shaped the contours of the subject.
    London Metropolitan Archives
    • £38.40
    • RRP £48.00
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    The attack on London between 1939 and 1945 is one of the most significant events in the citys modern history, the impact of which can still be seen in its urban and social landscapes. As a key record of the attack, the London County Council Bomb Damage Maps represent destruction on a huge scale, recording buildings and streets reduced to smoke and rubble. The full set of maps is made up of 110 hand-coloured 1:2500. Ordnance Survey base sheets originally published in 1916 but updated by the LCC to 1940. Because they use the 1916 map, they give us a glimpse of a lost London, before post-war redevelopment schemes began to shape the modern city. The colouring applied to the maps records a scale of damage to Londons built environment during the war the most detailed and complete survey of destruction caused by the aerial bombardment. A clear and fascinating introduction by expert Laurence Ward sets the maps in the full historical context of the events that gave rise to them, supported by archival photographs and tables of often grim statistics.
    Tom Harper
    • £32.00
    • RRP £40.00
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    The 20th century was a period of profound political, social and technological change. Population growth and movement, revolutions in transportation and communication, and the onset of the digital age meant that life would never be the same. It is impossible to overstate the significance of maps, which crept into everyday life during this period. They were both unsung heroes and unreliable witnesses capable of informing but also misleading. They are always subjective, and always worthy of interrogation. Highlights of this global study include a trench-map of the Somme battlefields, a bomb damage map of London, early maps of the ocean floor, a poster showing Mao studying a map on his Long March and a Russian moon globe from 1961. Other maps discussed here include: the United Nations flag, the first stamps of Independent Latvia (1918) printed on the backs of maps, and a motorway sign. As well as sheet maps and atlases, the book gathers models, stamps, medals, manuscripts, printed books, embroidery and photographs. The book also examines changes in mapping technology, from the land surveys of 1900 to the development of satellite imagery by 2000."
    John Speed
    • £24.00
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    A stunning new edition of the earliest atlas of the British Isles. Britain's Tudor Maps: County by County reproduces the maps of John Speed's 1611 collection The Theatre of Great Britaine in large, easy-to-read format for the first time. Compiled from 1596, these richly detailed maps show each county of Great Britain individually and as they existed at the time, complete with a wealth of heraldic decoration, illustrations and royal portraits. With an introduction by the bestselling author Nigel Nicholson, each map is presented alongside a fascinating commentary by Alasdair Hawkyard, elaborating on both the topographical features and the social conditions of each county at the time, enabling an examination of how the physical and social landscape has been transformed over time.
    Beau Riffenburgh
    • £24.00
    • RRP £30.00
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    Discover some of the great archival treasures of the Royal Geographical Society. Some of the greatest expeditions are described and illustrated with maps, photographs and illustrations by official artists and photographers, and members of the expedition teams. The book also includes the first travellers, who set off with sketchbook or camera, as well as diplomats who chose to explore the wider regions into which they were posted. These men and women provided Westerners with the first images of Northern Arabia, China and Nepal, and South America. They record the attempts to summit the world's highest mountain and reach the polar extremes. For anyone with a love of adventure, this book will be an informative journey and a visual delight.
    National Geographic
    • £24.89
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    Atlas of Indian Nations is a comprehensive resource for those interested in Native American history and culture. Told through maps, photos, art, and archival cartography, this is the story of American Indians that only National Geographic can tell. In the most comprehensive atlas of Native American history and culture available, the story of the North American Indian is told through maps, photos, art, and archival cartography. This illustrated atlas is perfect for fans of Empire of the Summer Moon, Blood and Thunder, and National Geographic atlases, as well as those fascinated with the Old West. Organised by region, this encyclopaedic reference details Indian tribes in these areas: beliefs, sustenance, shelter, alliances and animosities, key historical events, and more. See the linguistic groupings and understand the constantly shifting, overlapping boundaries of the tribes. Follow the movement, growth, decline, and continuity of Indian nations and their lifestyles.
    Frank Jacobs
    • £19.99
    • RRP £24.99
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    Spanning many centuries, all continents and the realms of outer space and the imagination, this collection of 138 unique graphics combines beautiful full-colour illustrations with quirky statistics and smart social commentary. The result is a distinctive illustrated guide to the world. Brimming with trivia, deadpan humour and idiosyncratic lore, Strange Maps is a fascinating tour of all things weird and wonderful in the world of cartography.
    Ashley Baynton-Williams
    • £20.19
    • RRP £25.00
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    Mapmaking has always been a serious business, whether surveying property limits, marking international boundaries or plotting lines of travel. Yet cartographers of all periods had a sense of humour, and mapmakers often used their artistic talents to create maps not for strictly geographical purposes but for the pleasure and entertainment of others. In this book, an expert cartographic researcher uncovers 100 curious, entertaining maps, drawn mainly from the unrivalled map collection in the British Library. Many of the maps depict countries in human or animal form, among them the famous 'Leo Belgicus' - the Low Countries in the shape of a lion. Many of the maps featured here were created for recreational play, with the secondary purpose of educating through enjoyment, including some of the very earliest cartographical game-maps, jigsaws, playing-card maps and even a jigsaw globe.With advances in printing techniques, publishers found they could affix maps to all manner of objects, often commemorative, such as the tankard celebrating Nelson's victory at Trafalgar in 1805. There are also maps on cups and saucers, tea towels, umbrellas, scarves and commemorative medals. Through images of these maps and many more, this amusing and unusual book reveals the little-known playful side of mapmaking.
    Graham Robb
    • £16.00
    • RRP £20.00
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    The Debatable Land was an independent territory which used to exist between Scotland and England. At the height of its notoriety, it was the bloodiest region in Great Britain, fought over by Henry VIII, Elizabeth I and James V. After the Union of the Crowns, most of its population was slaughtered or deported and it became the last part of the country to be brought under the control of the state. Today, its history has been forgotten or ignored.When Graham Robb moved to a lonely house on the very edge of England, he discovered that the river which almost surrounded his new home had once marked the Debatable Land's southern boundary. Under the powerful spell of curiosity, Robb began a journey - on foot, by bicycle and into the past - that would uncover lost towns and roads, reveal the truth about this maligned patch of land and result in more than one discovery of major historical significance.Rich in detail and epic in scope, The Debatable Land takes us from a time when neither England nor Scotland could be imagined to the present day, when contemporary nationalism and political turmoil threaten to unsettle the cross-border community once more. Writing with his customary charm, wit and literary grace, Graham Robb proves the Debatable Land to be a crucial, missing piece in the puzzle of British history.Includes a 16-page colour plate section.
    John Moore
    • £26.19
    • RRP £30.00
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    Maps can tell much about a place that traditional histories fail to communicate. This lavishly illustrated book features 80 maps which have been selected for the particular stories they reveal about different political, commercial and social aspects of Scotland's largest city. The maps featured provide fascinating insights into topics such as: the development of the Clyde and its shipbuilding industry, the villages which were gradually subsumed into the city, how the city was policed, what lies underneath the city streets, the growth of Glasgow during the Industrial Revolution, the development of transport, the city's green spaces, the health of Glasgow, Glasgow as a tourist destination, the city as a wartime target, and its regeneration in the 1980s as the host city of one of the UK's five National Garden Festivals. Together, they present a fascinating insight into how Glasgow has changed and developed over the last 500 years, and will appeal to all those with an interest in Glasgow and Scottish history, as well as those interested in urban history, architectural history, town planning and the history of maps.
    O. D. Case
    • £15.19
    • RRP £18.99
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    15 colour maps on plates with traditional illustrations with important references from Josephus and Origen together with Biblical text references The text further illustrated with traditional illustrations An essential companion for biblical Old Testament studies covering Palestine at the time of Christ and ancient history in context and useful for tracking of the journeys of The Israelites, Empires of the Syrians, Greeks, Alexander and Romans. Full details of Paul's apostolic journeys
    Peter Barber
    • £26.69
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    Over the past 2000 years London has developed from a small town, fitting snugly within its walls, into one of the world's largest and most dynamic cities. This book illustrates and helps to explain the transformation. Side-by-side with the great, semi-official but sanitised images of the whole city, there are the more utilitarian maps and plans of the parts - actual and envisaged - which perhaps present a more truthful picture. But the maps and panoramas are far more than topographical records. They all have something unique to say about them concerns, assumptions, ambitions and prejudices of Londoners at the time when they were created. The book reveals the 'inside story' behind one of the world's greatest cities.
    Daniel MacCannell
    • £26.99
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    Over the past four and a half centuries, the magnificent city of Oxford has been mapped for many reasons, few of which have involved the mere finding of one's way through the streets. Maps were produced as part of schemes to defend Oxford from rampaging Roundheads, raging floodwaters, and the ravages of cholera; to plan the new canals and bridges of the eighteenth century and the new railways, tramways and suburbs of the nineteenth; to determine and display changes in the city's political stature under the Reform Acts of 1832 and 1867; to aid police enforcement of the laws against homosexuality; and even to plan a Soviet ground assault on the heart of the British motor industry. Given its status as a world centre of drama, poetry, literature, music, architecture, and scientific experimentation, and sometime royal capital, it is unsurprising that Oxford was the first British town to be included in map form in a tourist guidebook, as early as 1762, and one of just two inland towns mapped by French invasion planners in the Seven Years' War.For the first time, this lavishly illustrated volume brings together sixty of the most remarkable maps and views of the area that have been made by friend and foe since 1575.
    Ian Vince
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
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    Like most of us, Ian Vince used to think of the British countryside as average, unexciting - as dramatic as a nice cup of tea. Then, over the course of a single car journey, the features of our green and pleasant land reawakened a fascination with geology that he had long forgotten, and he began to delve beneath the surface (metaphorically, that is). From the rocks of north-west Scotland which are amongst the oldest on the planet to St Michael's Mount off the coast of Cornwall, which was still being shaped in human memory, "The Lie of the Land" takes us on a journey through a fantastically exotic Britain of red desert sands, shattering continental collisions and tides of volcanic lava. Ian Vince shows us how Britain came to look the way it does; and with warmth and wit transports us back through billions of years to a land that time forgot.
    John OE Clark
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
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    An ancient Chinese proverb suggests, "They are wise parents who give their children roots and wings - and a map." Maps That Changed the World features some of the world's most famous maps, stretching back to a time when cartography was in its infancy and the 'edge of the world' was a barrier to exploration. The book includes details of how the Lewis and Clark Expedition helped map the American West, and how the British mapped India and Australia. Included are the beautifully engraved Dutch maps of the 16th century; the sinister Utopian maps of the Nazis; the maps that presaged brilliant military campaigns; charted the geology of a nation; and the ones that divided a continent up between its European conquerors. Organised by theme, the book shows the evolution of map-making from all corners of the globe, from ancient clay maps, to cartographic breakthroughs such as Harry Beck's map of the London underground. There are also famous fictional maps, including the maps of the lost continent of Atlantis and Tolkien's Middle Earth. With an introduction written by acclaimed cartographic historian Jeremy Black.
    Rose Mitchell
    • £27.00
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    A map is a snapshot of a place, a city, a nation or even the world at a given point in time - fascinating for what they tell us about the way our ancestors saw themselves, their neighbours and their place in the world. This magnificent collection, drawn from seven centuries of maps held in the National Archives at Kew, looks at a variety of maps, from those found in 14th Century manuscripts, through early estate maps, to sea charts, maps used in military campaigns, and maps from treaties. The text explores who the mapmakers were, the purposes for which the maps were made, and what it tells us about the politics of the time. Great images are accompanied by compelling stories. Featured is a woodcut map of 16th Century London, a map of where the bombs fell during the Second World War, and a map the first American settlers' drew when they were attempting to establish a new empire on Roanoke Island, off the coast of what is now North Carolina. Richly illustrated with large scale reproductions of the maps, the book also includes some of the more amusing or esoteric maps from the National Archives, such as the map of the Great Exhibition in 1851 that was presented on a lady's glove, a London Underground map in the form of a cucumber, and a Treasure Island map used to advertise National Savings. This is a fascinating and unusual journey through the world of maps and mapmakers.
    Christopher Fleet
    • £27.00
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    As miniature worlds, beautiful locations and homes to communities seemingly distant from the stresses of modern life, Scotland's many islands have an extraordinary fascination on countless people, not least on the hundreds of thousands of visitors who visit them each year. Maps too fascinate, as objects of visual delight and historical importance, and as a means to represent and understand landscapes. This stimulating and informative book reproduces some of the most beautiful and historically significant maps from the National Library of Scotland's magnificent collection in order to explore the many dimensions of island life and how this has changed over time. Arranged thematically and covering topics such as population, place-names, defence, civic improvement, natural resources, navigation, and leisure and tourism, Scotland: Mapping the Islands presents the rich and diverse story of Scottish islands from the earliest maps to the most up-to date techniques of digital mapping in a unique and imaginative way.
    Peter Whitfield
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
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    Throughout history people have sought ways in which to map the heavens. From the sources of mathematics and mythology sprang the classic star chart, the finest examples of which are both scientific documents and works of art. In this beautifully illustrated book, Peter Whitfield reveals some of the ways in which the structure of the universe has been conceived, explained and depicted. With examples ranging from the Stone Age to the Space Age - ancient observatories, the angelic visions of Dante, images from the Copernican revolution, the rationalized heavens of Isaac Newton, and modern deep space technology - Whitfield offers a challenging exploration of the tension between rigorous scientific knowledge and the continuing search for cause, certainty and harmony in the universe. This new edition is updated to include a wider range of stunning maps of the skies in full colour, including imagery from the latest voyages of space exploration.
    Mike Parker
    • £12.19
    • RRP £14.99
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    The story of Britain's road development - graphically and beautifully illustrated on our maps - is also the story of its political, economic and social history. And the car, more than any other single factor, has shaped our landscape andchanged our maps.Busy, bustling, often creaking at the seams, most of us have a love-hate relationship with our roads. Like it or not, our modern lifestyles depend on them - not only for getting there from A to B, but for the distribution ofalmost everything we buy.Yet once upon a time, the building of roads was seen as a glorious and heroic enterprise. Britain's motorways - 'the cathedrals of the modern world' - are the ultimate expression of our modern age. From the old ways to the motorways,Mapping the Roads, charts the ambitions and hopes of the nation through our maps.
    John Crowley
    • £52.25
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    The Atlas of the Irish Revolution is a landmark publication that presents scholarship on the revolutionary period in a uniquely accessible manner. Featuring over 200 original maps and 300 images, the Atlas includes 120 contributions by leading scholars from a range of disciplines. They offer multiple perspectives on the pivotal years from the 1912 Home Rule crisis to the end of the Irish Civil War in 1923. Using extensive original data (much of it generated from newly-released archival material), researchers have mapped social and demographic change, political and cultural activity, state and non-state violence and economic impacts. The maps also portray underlying trends in the decades before the revolution and capture key aspects of the revolutionary aftermath. They show that while the Irish revolution was a 'national' event, it contained important local and regional variations that were vital to its outcomes. The representation of island-wide trends stand alongside street-level, parish, county and provincial studies that uncover the multi-faceted dynamics at play.The Atlas also captures the international dimensions of a revolution that occurred amidst the First World War and its tumultuous aftermath. Revolutionary events in Ireland received global attention because they profoundly challenged the British imperial project. Key revolutionaries operated transnationally before, during and after the conflict, while the Irish diaspora provided crucial support networks. The often neglected roles of women and workers are illuminated, while commentators consider the legacies of the revolution, including collective memories, cultural representations and historical interpretations. The Atlas of the Irish Revolution brings history to life for general readers and students, as well as academics. It represents a ground-breaking contribution to the historical geography of these compelling years of conflict, continuity and change.
    • £10.39
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    **Pointing persistently to heaven: A guide to UK cathedrals** Power, glory, bloodshed, prayer: cathedrals in the UK are as much about human drama as spiritual sanctuary, as much about political wrangling as religious fervour. From Christian beginnings in the Middle Ages through Reformation, Renaissance and Modernity, the great cathedrals of Britain have been both battleground and place of quiet reflection; created for the glory of God for sure, but also for the glory of men. There s a litany of great deeds and a list of secrets tied up in our national cathedrals and all are revealed within our guides, the ideal companions to the stories behind the greatest cathedrals of all. Whether you are travelling to view the buildings themselves or being an armchair enthusiast, let us take you on a journey. **Book One: The North of England and Scotland** From early Celtic influences through to English Reformation and the rise of Scots Calvinism, Scotland and the north of England has had a turbulent religious history. It was once united as the Kingdom of Northumbria, from Edinburgh and Lothian right down to the Humber, incorporating the counties of Durham and York and the holy isle of Lindisfarne. Today the kingdom has been dismantled but the cathedrals, which include some of the most famous buildings in the UK, still flourish and offer their secrets for discovery. Here you will solve the mystery recently uncovered in a mass grave in the country s oldest cathedral. Find a link to one of the UK s most famous retailers in an 11th century building. Enter inside the grand Scottish cathedral built in tribute to a 7th century Greek hermit. And go underground to discover a Saxon crypt, dating from the mid 600s.
    Jo Woolf
    • £22.49
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    Fifty stories of adventure and exploration over more than two hundred years of human history. The Great Horizon features those who set out to conquer new territories and claim world records alongside those who contributed to our understanding of the world all but accidentally. Published in association with the Royal Scottish Geographical Society, and with full access to their extensive records, the book includes unique images and insights from the RSGS archives, along with never-before seen material.