Regional History

  • There Once Was a Man with Six Wives - Hardback - 9781911042235 - Mick Twister
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    Featuring a host of limericks about Britain's kings and queens, this book recounts their reigns in rhymes, covering all their lives and times.

    Pocket-sized and bursting with fun illustrations, each entry has a limerick and then gives further details on the events that happened during the ruler's times.

    There's even a fact box that shows you how long they reigned, the reason they took the throne and their age at accession.

    Please note this book contains mature themes and content unsuitable for younger readers.
  • BRKGX
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    THE REVIVAL AND RESTORATION of the Welsh Highland Railway is one of the greatest heritage railway achievements of the 21st Century, yet its success followed more than one hundred years of failure. Supported by public loans, its first incarnation combined the moribund North Wales Narrow Gauge Railways, some of the abandoned works of the Portmadoc, Beddgelert & South Snowdon Railway and part of the horse-worked Croesor Tramway. Opened in 1923, it was closed in 1937 and the track was lifted in 1941. Serious talk of revival started in the 1960s but restoration did not start until 1997, with the neighbouring Ffestiniog Railway at the helm, supported by generous donors and benefactors, the Millennium Commission, the Welsh Government and teams of enthusiastic volunteers. Author Peter Johnson steers a course through the railway's complicated pre-history before describing the events, including a court hearing, three public inquiries and a great deal of controversy, leading to the start of services between Caernarfon and Porthmadog in 2011. A postscript describes post-completion developments.
  • BMPAH
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    The Underground network in London has always held a fascination for historians and transport enthusiasts, from the early days of the steam operated system in the 1860s. Todays London Underground covers the network as it is today, with features on the different lines across the capital and the modern day rolling stock in use, which serve London. The book covers all aspects of operation in pictures and text, with features on depots, stations, infrastructure and servicing facilities.
  • BNHHF
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    Vilified as the great failure of all London Transport bus classes, the DMS family of Daimler Fleetline was more like an unlucky victim of straitened times. Desperate to match staff shortages with falling demand for its services during the late 1960s, London Transport was just one organisation to see nationwide possibilities and savings in legislation that was about to permit double-deck one-man-operation and partially fund purpose-built vehicles. However, prohibited by circumstances from developing its own rear-engined Routemaster (FRM) concept, LT instituted comparative trials between contemporary Leyland Atlanteans and Daimler Fleetlines.The latter came out on top, and massive orders followed. The first DMSs entering service on 2 January 1971. In service, however, problems quickly manifested. Sophisticated safety features served only to burn out gearboxes and gulp fuel. The passengers, meanwhile, did not appreciate being funnelled through the DMS's recalcitrant automatic fare-collection machinery only to have to stand for lack of seating.Boarding speeds thus slowed to a crawl, to the extent that the savings made by laying off conductors had to be negated by adding more DMSs to converted routes! Second thoughts caused the ongoing order to be amended to include crew-operated Fleetlines (DMs), noise concerns prompted the development of the B20 'quiet bus' variety, and brave attempts were made to fit the buses into the time-honoured system of overhauling at Aldenham Works, but finally the problems proved too much. After enormous expenditure, the first DMSs began to be withdrawn before the final RTs came out of service, and between 1979 and 1983 all but the B20s were sold - as is widely known, the DMSs proved perfectly adequate with provincial operators once their London features had been removed. OPO was to become fashionable again in the 1980s as the politicians turned on London Transport itself, breaking it into pieces in order to sell it off. Not only did the B20 DMSs survive to something approaching a normal lifespan, but the new cheap operators awakening with the onset of tendering made use of the type to undercut LT, and it was not until 1993 that the last DMS operated.
  • AUSKV
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    The second millennium saw the spread and consolidation of Christianity in Britain. One means by which the Normans tightened their grip on Britain after 1066 was by the construction of magnificent cathedrals, thereby demonstrating their intention to remain here. In his earlier book - England's Cathedrals by Train - Murray Naylor explained how these hallowed buildings could be reached by train, relating their history and their principal features. His book invited readers to discover how the Normans and Victorians helped to shape our lives, either in constructing cathedrals or inventing railways. England's Great Historic Churches is the logical follow on to this book. Travelling across England it selects thirty-two of our ancient churches, relating their history and identifying those aspects which a visitor might overlook. His journeys include the great medieval abbeys at Tewkesbury, Selby and Hexham; the less well known priories at Cartmel and Great Malvern and other grand churches severely reduced after the Dissolution of Henry VIII's reign, notably at Bridlington and Christchurch.He visits a church at Chesterfield where the spire leans at a crooked angle and goes to Boston, where the church - known as the Stump - was a starting point for many who emigrated to America in the 17th Century. Pride of place goes to Beverley Minster. In parallel he offers further observations on how railways have developed since the early 1800s and their future.
  • BGXWK
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    This stunning selection of colour views, dating from the period 1953-1980, includes most of the vessels operated during this period by the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company and The Ramsey Steamship Company. Passenger boats and freighters are seen at ports on the island and on the mainland. There is comprehensive coverage of the Peel, Ramsey and Port Erin lines operated by the Isle of Man Railway with some outstanding views taken during the 1950s, together with excellent portraits of most of the locomotives, as well carriages, vans, wagons, lorries, stations, staff and signal boxes. Also covered are Douglas Station and its environs, St John's junction and the Sunday 'specials' to Braddan. Many of the rich mix of bus types operated by the railway subsidiary, Isle of Man Road Services, are seen in a variety of locations. Included are some of the vehicles delivered just before and shortly after the Second World War. There are good views of the fascinating Ramsey Pier Tramway and its unusual rolling stock, as well as rare scenes taken as early as 1953 on the Groudle Glen Railway. For anyone who loves the Isle of Man and its wealth of vintage transport, this book provides a remarkable trip down memory lane and a colourful reminder of some of its lost glories. The book is dedicated to the memory of John McCann who took brilliant colour views on the island starting in 1953.
  • BULVH
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    This visually arresting book takes the reader on a journey across the globe by presenting the most candid, immediate, and provocative images captured by the biggest names in street photography from its inception to today. Capturing daily life in every corner of the world, this sumptuous collection of great street photography shows the very best of the genre. From pre-war gelatin silver prints to 21st-century digital images, from documentary to abstract, from New York's Central Park to a mountain city in Mongolia, these photographs reveal the many ways street photography moves, informs, and excites us. The book includes work by the likes of Margaret Bourke-White, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Joel Meyerowitz, Gordon Parks, Andr Kert sz, Garry Winogrand, Roger Mayne, and other masters of street photography who pushed the genre's boundaries and continue to innovate today. Each exquisitely reproduced photograph is presented on a double-page spread and accompanied by an informative text. David Gibson's insightful introduction traces the history of street photography, reflects on its broad appeal, and looks toward the future of the genre.
  • BNZYU
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    Why build a Railway to Cambridge? This is the first substantive illustrated book about Cambridge Station which explores the opening of the station in 1845; the four principal railway companies which all worked to and from the station in a tangle of mutual inconvenience; the extensive goods traffic which was handled in the several goods yard around the station; and the way the Station operated from early beginnings, to what Abellio East Anglia and Network Rail offer today. Cambridge Station is renowned for having one of the longest single platforms in the UK, served by Up and Down trains. Ingenious trackwork and extensive signalling could satisfy passengers who were told at the central booking hall entrance: 'Turn left for Kings Lynn or right for London.' The book contains several pictures never before published, showing how the Eastern Counties and then the Great Eastern Railway Companies contrived Cambridge Station and the Engine Sheds, Goods Yards, Signal Boxes and extensive sidings to serve East Anglia. And it tells people stories too, because the author worked on the station in the 1950s and 1960s and knows Cambridge and East Anglia well. He is a geographer and writes with knowledge, wisdom and humour.
  • BMMRA
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    The photographs in this volume of Steam in the East Midlands and Lincolnshire cover an area beginning at Derby Headquarters of the Midland following the Midland line to Nottingham and its environs, pausing at locations en-route. Trent, in the south-east corner of Derbyshire, was a station without a town, its position and importance as an interchange junction for five main railway routes, through the plethora of junctions, served London, Birmingham, Derby, Chesterfield and Nottingham. Remarkably enough, trains could depart from opposite platforms, in opposite directions but to the same destination. There was also the constant procession of coal trains off the Erewash Valley line from the nearby Toton marshalling yard. Also featured is the Derby Friargate to Nottingham Victoria, the Great Northern Railway line, and the former Great Central route, along with scenes at Saxby where the Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway, mainly single track line diverged, running via Bourne to East Coast resorts. Finally, there are scenes at Grantham, where changing engines in 1954 was the order of the day. Locomotives are photographed at work, at rest and awaiting a call for scrap.
  • BNZDX
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    The 1970s were among London Transport s most troubled years. Prohibited from designing its own buses for the gruelling conditions of the capital, LT was compelled to embark upon mass orders for the broadly standard products of national manufacturers, which for one reason or another proved to be disastrous failures in the capital and were disposed of prematurely at a great loss. Despite a continuing spares shortage combined with industrial action, the old organisation kept going somehow, with the venerable RT and Routemaster families still at the forefront of operations. At the same time, the green buses of the Country Area were taken over by the National Bus Company as London Country Bus Services. Little by little, and not without problems of their own, the mostly elderly but standard inherited buses gave way to a variety of diverted orders, some successful others far from so, until by the end of the decade we could see a mostly NBC-standard fleet of one-man-operated buses in corporate leaf green.
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    Shetland is where Scotland meets Scandinavia and the North Sea hits the Atlantic Ocean. Isolated, unspoilt and rich in history and tradition, Shetland is a truly singular place. James Morton grew up there. Co-written with his father, broadcaster and journalist Tom Morton, Shetland: Cooking on the Edge of the World explores life on an island with food, drink and community at its heart. Surrounded by crystal-clear waters, Shetland seafood is second to none, and butter and cheese are made locally. The native lamb roams freely around the island, and the Shetland black potato cannot be found anywhere else in the world. Here cooks, farmers, crofters and fishermen toil following traditions that go back hundreds of years. The recipes take in the very best that the isles have to offer, from celebratory feasts (the tradition of "foy") through the food of the sea - mackerel, mussels, salmon - to treasures from the land (lamb, venison, beef) and earth. There's cooking born from necessity and thrift - smoking and preserving (home-smoked halibut, pickles) - and it simply wouldn't be Scottish without baking (bannocks, oatcakes, afternoon cakes and biscuits) and, of course, a wee dram. With spectacular photography throughout, and features on crofting, pit feasting and the annual Fire Festival, Up Helly Aa (which culminates in the burning of a Viking galley ship), Shetland: Cooking on the Edge of the World celebrates a very different kind of island paradise.
  • BQAWK
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    Katherine Soutar has provided the cover illustrations for the vast majority of books in The History Press' popular Folk Tales series. This new collection features the best of these illustrations along with an explanation of the inspiration behind each design. Through the introductory text accompanying each illustration we gain an insight into how this artist works, learn how creating her fascinating artwork is often very much a family affair, and read anecdotes about working with storytellers.
  • AACLF
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    Just as Peter Ackroyd's bestselling London is the biography of the city, "Thames: Sacred River" is the biography of the river, from sea to source. Exploring its history from prehistoric times to the present day, the reader is drawn into an extraordinary world, learning about the fishes that swam in the river and the boats that plied its surface; about floods and tides; hauntings and suicides; miasmas and malaria; locks, weirs and embankments; bridges, docks and palaces. Peter Ackroyd has a genius for digging out the most surprising and entertaining details, and for writing about them in the most magisterial prose; the result is a wonderfully readable and captivating guide to this extraordinary river and the towns and villages which line it.
  • APLYJ
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    This historical gift book is a reincarnation of a guide to the river Thames first published 1829 by Samuel Leigh. The original was a concertina of 45 printed and hand-coloured sheets, glued together to form a magnificent 60ft depiction of the rivers north and south banks or Middlesex and Surrey banks, as they were then from Westminster Bridge to Petersham Meadows in Richmond. Among the buildings that stood along this 30-mile stretch of river in those days were many that no longer exist including the Houses of Parliament before they burned down in 1834, or the factory owned by the father of Isambard Kingdom Brunel but others still stand today. A great deal of the original panorama shows just trees and foliage, so for this book it has been edited down to feature the most interesting sections. These are grouped into 19 villages, each with a short 200-word introduction. The buildings are captioned (in the present tense, for vivid appeal), and there is an AZ detailing landmarks and key buildings in each section. Written in collaboration with local experts and various local history societies, these descriptions are richly informative and include information on the waterway, the landscape, and the people who lived and worked on the banks of the river at the end of the Georgian era.
  • BVGME
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    Washington, D.C. has long been known as a frustrating and sometimes confusing city for its residents to call home. The monumental core of federal office buildings, museums, and the National Mall dominates the city\u2019s surrounding neighborhoods and urban fabric. For much of the postwar era, Washingtonians battled to make the city their own, fighting the federal government over the basic question of home rule, the right of the city\u2019s residents to govern their local affairs. In Historic Capital, urban historian Cameron Logan examines how the historic preservation movement played an integral role in Washingtonians\u2019 claiming the city as their own. Going back to the earliest days of the local historic preservation movement in the 1920s, Logan shows how Washington, D.C.\u2019s historic buildings and neighborhoods have been a site of contestation between local interests and the expansion of the federal government\u2019s footprint. He carefully analyzes the long history of fights over the right to name and define historic districts in Georgetown, Dupont Circle, and Capitol Hill and documents a series of high-profile conflicts surrounding the fate of Lafayette Square, Rhodes Tavern, and Capitol Park, SW before discussing D.C. today.Diving deep into the racial fault lines of D.C., Historic Capital also explores how the historic preservation movement affected poor and African American residents in Anacostia and the U Street and Shaw neighborhoods and changed the social and cultural fabric of the nation\u2019s capital. Broadening his inquiry to the United States as a whole, Logan ultimately makes the provocative and compelling case that historic preservation has had as great an impact on the physical fabric of U.S. cities as any other private or public sector initiative in the twentieth century.
  • AUVZM
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    This lavishly produced book brings together an impressive amount of new historical research which seeks to answer this question, providing fresh interpretations of Leicester's history since 1800. The chapters analyse the events, changes and characteristics that have shaped the city and given it its distinctive identity. The sights, sounds and smells of the city in the twenty-first century are products of cumulative layers of history, layers which are peeled back by a specially assembled team of historians, all of whom have lived and worked in Leicester for many years. The result is an important book which helps us to understand the city's past, so that we may better understand the present and know how to approach the future. Above all, this fascinating volume demonstrates that Leicester is a quietly confident city built on firm historical foundations of which Leicester citizens of today can feel very proud.
  • BKVXD
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    Welcome to Around Manchester in the 1970s . Those of you who have had a look at Around Manchester in the 1950s and Around Manchester in the 1960s know what you are in for. For those of you who are fresh to these books, the plot goes something like this. This book came about following discussions to reprint earlier publications such as The Changing Face of Manchester in the Seventies and Salford Past. However, one of the points raised was that many of the images had been done to death, having already appeared in other publications and that in all honesty we should include as much fresh material as possible. Also, we decided to expand the number of photographs from around what in 1974 became the Metropolitan County of Greater Manchester, which comprises the boroughs of Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, Wigan and the cities of Manchester and Salford.
  • AZNYW
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    Melancholy Witness is the published collection of the images of Sean Hillen's lauded exhibition of photography, documenting the years of The Troubles in Northern Ireland. Combining personality with documentary history, what emerges is a powerful and compelling story of unrest, beauty and change.
  • AUVZN
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    This lavishly produced book brings together an impressive amount of new historical research which seeks to answer this question, providing fresh interpretations of Leicester's history since 1800. The chapters analyse the events, changes and characteristics that have shaped the city and given it its distinctive identity. The sights, sounds and smells of the city in the twenty-first century are products of cumulative layers of history, layers which are peeled back by a specially assembled team of historians, all of whom have lived and worked in Leicester for many years. The result is an important book which helps us to understand the city's past, so that we may better understand the present and know how to approach the future. Above all, this fascinating volume demonstrates that Leicester is a quietly confident city built on firm historical foundations of which Leicester citizens of today can feel very proud.
  • BAEQQ
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    Edinburgh's New Town, built between 1767 and 1850, is one of Europe's finest neoclassical neighbourhoods, a triumph of town planning, with UNESCO World Heritage status. But the importance of the New Town goes far beyond the quality of its architecture. Nearly 250 years after it was built, today it is not only a carefully conserved Georgian neighbourhood but a vibrant community in which people from all walks of life thrive in harmonious surroundings. Those include over 7,000 residential properties of enormous variety, and its shops, schools, pubs, restaurants and community facilities, which contribute to its unique quality of life and attract visitors from around the world. This book celebrates the history and achievements of the New Town. Through photos, drawings, historic maps and aerial photography, the authors explore the New Town's origins in the philiosophy of the Enlightenment and the role of politics, land ownership, finance, design and materials in its development. This is a friendly and accessible introduction to the exteriors and interiors of its buildings, with a walking tour included, drawing on both historic maps and modern satellite images. It links the New Town to current debates on urban architecture, concluding that it is an inspiring model for new communities around the world. This is a book for the passionate, knowledgeable lover of Georgian architecture, but equally for the casual visitor who wants to get to know the New Town better.
  • BRYDN
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    London has always been a bustling place of trade; once the docks teemed with men, ships and goods from all over the world. Now all has been transformed: starting at Canary Wharf and continuing at the Royal Docks, a vibrant new area has sprung into existence providing commerce, housing, shops and restaurants. In London's Docklands the author takes you on a journey though the historical development of the area. He outlines life at the docks, the troubled industrial relations, their heyday as the hub of the Empire's trade and their eventual demise. Discover a collection of unique buildings, hidden tunnels, pioneering voyages and historical riverside pubs.
  • BVXQF
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    The pictures in this book show the changes that have happened in the East End of London since the beginning of the 1960s. A rag-and-bone man rings his bell to let the residents of Stratford know he is doing his rounds to collect any old junk; a tradesman uses his horse to pull the barrow; the local greengrocer comes round once a week with supplies. One old man uses a bike to collect goods with a sign saying `Complete homes purchased'; local traders sell cockles and whelks at an East Ham market, while others enjoy a pint and play cards in the local pub; another old man hawks his goods at the docks, selling shoelaces and boot polish. With never before seen images, this beautiful collection is a must-see for all Londoners.
  • BMPWV
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    Ron Buckley's photographs show the changing locomotive scene taking place from the later 1930s throughout the East Midlands and East Anglia, illustrating pre-grouping locomotive classes still working across Lincoln, Cambridge, Norfolk, Suffolk, Nottingham, Leicester, Northampton, Bedford, Hertford, Buckingham and Essex. During later LNER days, locomotives of the Great Eastern and Great Northern Railways continued working the many secondary routes and branch lines while the main East Coast saw from 1935 the appearance of Nigel Gresley's streamlined class A4 locomotives working the high speed passenger traffic between Edinburgh and London. The LMS influence saw many former London and North Western and Midland Railway locomotives handling both passenger and goods traffic especially the product of the many collieries in Nottinghamshire.
  • BRIYT
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    Shirley Baker started to photograph the streets of Manchester and Salford in the early 1960s when homes were being demolished and communities were being uprooted. 'Whole streets were disappearing and I hoped to capture some trace of everyday life of the people who lived there. I was particularly interested in the more mundane, even trivial, aspects of life that were not being recorded by anyone else.' Shirley's powerful images, sparked by her curiosity, recorded people and communities involved in fundamental change. People's homes were demolished as part of a huge `slum' clearance programme, however Shirley was able to capture some of the street life as it had been for generations before the change. The areas have been redeveloped to form a new and totally different environment. As Shirley once said, 'I hope by bridging time through the magic of photography, a connection has been made with a past that should not be forgotten'.