Railway Books

  • ASHOQ
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    Experience the world by train Why do people love trains so much? Tom Chesshyre is on a mission to find the answer by experiencing the world through train travel - on both epic and everyday rail routes, aboard every type of ride, from steam locomotives to bullet trains, meeting a cast of memorable characters who share a passion for train travel. Join him on the rails and off the beaten track as he embarks on an exhilarating whistle-stop tour around the globe, from Sri Lanka to Iran via Crewe, Inverness, the Australian outback and beyond.
  • AFBHA
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    A new and comprehensive history of one of our best-loved railway companies. 'God's Wonderful Railway', the astonishing engineering feat of Isambard Kingdom Brunel's main line from Paddington to Penzance, with its stupendous bridge over the River Tamar, endless Box Tunnel and exhilarating stretch alongside the sea at Dawlish Warren, has always been beloved of anyone who likes trains. Andrew Roden's comprehensive new history of this remarkable railway company, whose well-engineered lines survive not only into the privatised era of First Great Western but also in numerous lovingly restored steam railways like the Dart Valley, tells the story of nothing less than the opening-up of the isolated south-west of England to the trade and tourism of the modern age. It has left us with soaring termini like Paddington and Bristol Temple Meads as well as glorious railway institutions like the Night Riviera overnight sleeper to Cornwall that endure to this day (not least thanks to the author's own campaigning!). While the GWR's green locomotives and chocolate and cream carriages may have given way to purple, anyone who wants to return to the golden age of the railways will find the company's history an enthralling journey.
  • AHXTD
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    The LNER Class A3 Pacific locomotive No. 4472 'Flying Scotsman' is one of the world's most iconic steam engines. It was built in 1923 for the London and North Eastern Railway at Doncaster Works to a design by Nigel Gresley. Taking its name from the London to Edinburgh non-stop service on which it was employed, 'Flying Scotsman' worked many long-distance express trains in a career in which it covered more than 2,000,000 miles (3,200,000 km). This fascinating pocket-book tells the story of this distinguished locomotive through authentic period literature including LNER and BR service manuals, giving an insight into her construction and operation from the height of her fame in the 1930s through to the end of her BR service in 1963.
  • ADLWH
    (1)
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    Collector's item, landmark in the history of the tour guide, snapshot of Britain in the 1860s - Bradshaw's Handbook deserves a place on the bookshelf of any traveller, railway enthusiast, historian or anglophile. Produced as the British railway network was reaching its zenith, and as tourism by rail became a serious pastime for the better off, it was the first national tourist guide specifically organized around railway journeys, and to this day offers a glimpse through the carriage window at a Britain long past. This is a facsimile of the actual book - often referred to as 'Bradshaw's Guide' - used in the 'Great British Railway Journeys' television series, possibly the only surviving example of the 1863 edition. Bradshaw's Handbook was regularly updated, with the journeys featured, and the remarks made, differing between editions. This is the only available version of the 1863 edition.
  • AKTRJ
    • £19.89
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    2014 sees the 120th anniversary of the opening of the West Highland Railway between Craigendoran and Fort William, when the through journey from Glasgow took some five hours. With the great age of railway building almost over, the West Highland was from the outset a 'social line', though corporate empire building and speculation played a part. Subsequently extended to Mallaig, with state assistance, the West Highland route has been voted top railway journey - and the most scenic - in the world. From the north shore of the Firth of Clyde, the line passes the Gare Loch, Loch Long and Loch Lomond before crossing desolate but beautiful Rannoch Moor. From Corrour, Britain's highest and most inaccessible railway station, it descends through Glen Spean into Lochaber. In this profusely illustrated book, Dr John McGregor takes a look at this famous line, from its construction to the present day - the men who built it; its early years and varied fortunes thereafter; changing traffic patterns; advertising and tourism; maintenance and mishaps; and the return of heritage steam.
  • ABXSG
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    Whitby Railway was opened in July 1885. The 21 miles of line traversed the picturesque coast between the two towns for eighty years. There were eight stations on the line all with their own distinctive character and serving the different needs of visitors and local people. All of the stations along the route are fully illustrated in this book. The line closed in March 1965 and the buildings were later sold into private ownership and have been put to a variety of uses since that time. The aim of this book is to illustrate the changes both before and after closure along this fascinating and historical railway which has become a very popular walking and cycling trail that passes through the spectacular and varied scenery of the North Yorkshire coast.
  • BGXWL
    • £40.00
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    The German Pacific Locomotive (Its Design and Development) is David Maidments fourth book in the series of Locomotive Profiles published by Pen & Sword. It is the first in the series to tackle an important range of overseas steam locomotives, the German pacific locomotives, which, with the Paris-Orleans pacific in France, were the first of that wheel layout in Europe and came to be the dominant type for express passenger work throughout Western Europe for the following fifty years, until displaced by diesel and electric traction. The German railways in the first two decades of the twentieth century were run principally as regional State railways, and two distinct styles of design developed, which were influenced by the natural terrain. In the south, in the mountainous foothills of the European Alps, four cylinder compound locomotives with comparatively small coupled wheels, most produced by the famous firm of Maffei in Munich, held sway from 1907 until the late 1930s, and in parts of Bavaria that were not yet electrified, even until the early 1960s.In the flatter lands of the north, Prussian 4-6-0s sufficed until Paul Wagners standard two cylinder simple pacifics came onto the scene in 1925, and were followed by the three cylinder streamlined pacifics at the start of the Second World War. After addressing the devastating damage to the German railways in the conflict, the book follows the modernisation of the locomotive fleet in the post-war period until the elimination of steam in both East and West Germany in the mid-late 1970s. The book describes the design, construction and operation of the full range of pacifics that ran in both parts of Germany, and the large numbers of these locomotives that have been preserved, and is illustrated with over 180 black and white and 80 colour photos.
  • BSMIL
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    The North British Railway's West Highland Line, stretching from the banks of the Firth of Clyde to Fort William, opened in 1894, and was subsequently extended to the fishing port of Mallaig on the Atlantic coast in 1901. It is this latter part of the `Iron Road to the Isles' that forms the major part of this book, hailed as one of the most scenic railway routes in the British Isles. Steam trains returned to the Mallaig line in 1984, eventually becoming the celebrated `Jacobite' service. Now an integral and indispensible part of the Scottish tourist scene, the trains run from Easter to Christmas and the New Year, twice daily during the peak season. In this superbly illustrated portrait of the line, 35 of the UK's top railway photographers have contributed pictures to create a quite stunning pictorial record. The great variety of photographic styles, using the route's many glorious vantage points, provides a mesmerising mix of unforgettable images, not just of the steam trains themselves but also the majestic Scottish landscape through which they run.
  • ALODQ
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    Never before has a comprehensive history been written of the track used by railways of all gauges, tramways, and cliff railways, in Great Britain. And yet it was the development of track, every bit as much as the development of the locomotive, that has allowed our railways to provide an extraordinarily wide range of services. Without the track of today, with its laser-guided maintenance machines, the TGV and the Eurostar could not cruise smoothly at 272 feet per second, nor could 2,000-ton freight trains carry a wide range of materials, or suburban railways, over and under the ground, serve our great cities in a way that roads never could. Andrew Dow's account of the development of track, involving deep research in the papers of professional institutions as well as rare books, company records and personal accounts, paints a vivid picture of development from primitive beginnings to modernity. The book contains nearly 200 specially-commissioned drawings as well as many photographs of track in its very many forms since the appearance of the steam locomotive in 1804. Included are chapters on electrified railways, and on the development of mechanised maintenance, which revolutionised the world of the platelayer.
  • BQLAT
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    It is possible that in the history of British steam locomotives no class of engine was ever more universally popular than the Stanier '5MT' 4-6-0 class, which were generally referred to as 'Black Fives'. This informative book includes numerous images of the class at work, many of which are published for the first time. Introduced by the London Midland & Scottish Railway (LMS) in 1934 the building of the 842-strong class was shared between the locomotive works at Crewe, Horwich and Derby and also by the private builders Armstrong Whitworth Ltd. and Vulcan Foundry Ltd. With the exception of a pause in production during the war time years 'Black Five' locomotives continued to be built until May 1951, when the last example was out-shopped from BR Horwich Works. Only four examples of the class were named, but a fifth locomotive was allocated a name which it reportedly never carried. They were often referred to as the finest mixed-traffic locomotives ever to run in Britain. William Arthur Stanier joined the LMS in 1932 having previously served the Great Western Railway (GWR) at Swindon Works, doubtless his LMS 2-cylinder tapered boiler 'Class 5' 4-6-0 design reflected his Swindon experiences. This highly efficient and reliable general-purpose design (in several variants) could generally be seen at work over all of the former LMS network, from Thurso in the north of Scotland to Bournemouth (Somerset & Dorset Joint Railway) in the south of England. They became the ultimate go everywhere steam locomotives, working all manner of trains from slow goods to express passenger services. In 1967 just prior to the end of steam, British Railways remarkably listed 151 Stanier 'Black Fives' as 'serviceable' locomotives. A total of 18 Stanier 'Black Five' locomotives survived into preservation, with the majority of those having been returned to steam.
  • BSNNQ
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    The Somme sector of the Western Front was held by French forces until early 1916, when the British and Dominions Third and Fourth Armies moved into the northern part, before the joint First Battle of the Somme from July to November 1916\. In 1917, with the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line, British responsibility moved further south. By early 1918 the British Third and Fifth Armies were responsible as far south as east of Noyon. In Spring 1918 the German attack and advance from the Hindenburg Line came west almost to Amiens. However the British and French Armies finally stopped the advance, and from August 1918 drove the German Army back eastwards until the Armistice on 11 November 1918. In this book the metre gauge networks established before the First World War are examined. Then the build up of light (60cm gauge) railways, initially mainly French but later British, in 1915 and 1916, is considered, with an assessment of the contribution of these and the metre gauge lines to the war effort. With the major movements of the front line in this sector in 1917 and 1918, the response of the narrow gauge railways is considered chronologically as well as by area, in the context of overall railway policy and development. After the war the light railways contributed to the reconstruction of the devastated areas, and then in some places served the sugar beet industry. The metre gauge railways were rebuilt or repaired. The story is followed to the closure of the last of these railways in the 1960s. This book is a companion volume to Narrow Gauge in the Arras Sector (Pen & Sword Transport, 2015) by the same authors. It refers also to other previous works on British and French railways in the First World War, but contains sufficient information to stand alone. It describes how to find key locations now, and where rolling stock can be seen. Some walks are included for those who wish to explore the territory.
  • AFGEE
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    O. Winston Link is America's most celebrated railroad photographer. Link began photographing the Norfolk and Western, the last major steam railroad in the United States, in the mid 1950s, when the N&W was converting its operations from steam to diesel. Link's N&W project captured the railroad industry at a moment of transition, before the triumph of the automobile and the airplane that ended passenger service on the line and before the corresponding dramatic reduction in the workforce. And, just as importantly, Link's work reveals a small town way of life that was about to experience seismic shifts and in many cases vanish completely. The images in O. Winston Link: Life Along the Line focus on the people and communities surrounding the railroad, in particular recording life in the Appalachian portion of the Norfolk & Western's service area. The book is published in cooperation with the O. Winston Link Museum in Roanoke, Virginia, which holds the complete archive of Link's N&W project. It replaces two previous Abrams books on Link, Steam, Steel & Stars and The Last Steam Railroad in America. O. Winston Link: Life Along the Line offers a broad view of the entire range of Link's portfolio of the last years of the Norfolk and Western in steam, including excellent examples of both the keystone work and of the photographs, such as modernist images, that have not been previously published.
  • BMPDK
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    The first thought, when contemplating a new study of the Great Western Railway locomotive fleet, must surely be to ask what can there be left to say? But there is no single source which gives a general introduction to the Great Western locomotive fleet. There are monographs on individual classes, an excellent multi-volume detail study from the RCTS, and superb collections of photographs, but nothing that brings it all together. This work is intended to provide that general introduction. The volume begins with a series of short essays covering general trends in design development, whilst the main body of the volume covers individual classes. For each class there is a small table containing some principal dimensions and paragraphs of text, covering an introduction, renumbering, key changes in the development of the class and information on withdrawal. The volume concludes with appendices covering the development and types of standard boilers, the various numbering schemes used by the GWR, the arcane subject of locomotive diagrams and lot numbers, and a short reference on the many lines the GWR engulfed. The majority of illustrations are new profile drawings to a consistent format. Described as sketches, they are drawn to consistent scales, but do not claim to be scale drawings. Much minor equipment has been omitted and the author has certainly not dared to include rivets! Although most are based around GWR weight diagrams, they are not simple traces of the original drawings. Detail has been added from other sources, components copied from different drawings and details have been checked against historical and modern photographs. One must also bear in mind that steam locomotives were not mass produced. Minor fittings frequently varied in position and changes were made over the locomotives' lifetimes. Nevertheless, this collection of drawings provides a uniquely consistent view of the GWR locomotive fleet.
  • BSNMW
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    Southern Maunsell Moguls and Tank Engines is a volume in the series of Locomotive Profiles being published by Pen & Sword. It describes the conception, design and construction of the two- and three-cylinder 2-6-0s initially the 'Ns' constructed at the end of the First World War, many at government initiative by the Woolwich Arsenal and their three-cylinder variants, the 'N1s'. It also describes in similar fashion the class 'K' River 2-6-4 tank engines, their riding problems and the decision to convert them as class 'U' two-cylinder moguls after the disastrous Sevenoaks derailment in 1927\. The solitary 'K1' three-cylinder 2-6-4T was similarly converted as the prototype three-cylinder 'U1' with new build 'Us' and 'U1s' following in the early 1930s. The moguls, originally built by Richard Maunsell for the South Eastern & Chatham Railway, became the standard mixed traffic locomotives throughout the Southern Railway for virtually the whole of its existence and many remained until near the end of BR Southern Region's steam stock in 1965/6. After the experience with the passenger 2-6-4 tank engines, Maunsell restricted his larger tank engine designs to freight work - the class 'W' for heavy cross-London interchange freight traffic and the 'Z'0-8-0T for heavy shunting and banking work. Maunsell also redesigned some elderly LB&SCR E1 0-6-0Ts for branch line work in rural Devon and North Cornwall, providing a radial axle as 0-6-2T class E1/R. The book covers the allocation, operation and performance of these classes and includes some personal reminiscences of the author who experienced the moguls at first hand. It also covers the sale of some of the Woolwich moguls to the CIE in Ireland and the conversion of a number to 2-6-4 freight tank engines for the Metropolitan Railway. The book is lavishly illustrated with over 300 black and white and thirty colour photographs.
  • BTLUR
    • £27.20
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    This limited edition of just 300 copies illustrates the work of Network Rail during the past eight years to transform the Western Region from a diesel-only railway with track layouts from the 1960s and '70s to a modern electrified railway from Paddington to Cardiff and Newbury, with enhanced capability, new signalling systems and widespread equipment renewals, including the new station and flyovers at Reading. Using never before published photographs of the work both under way and completed, it provides a unique insight into the work involved. As well as covering the core section of the route between Paddington and Bristol, it also extends into Wales, Devon and Cornwall, emphasising the widespread nature of the work. As well as numerous photographs, it also includes track diagrams of new layouts, the campaign diagrams utilised during the big blockade works, and showing key stages of the works and milestones attained. This limited edition also includes previously unreleased photographs of this challenging electrification project as well as the extensive Crossrail works from Paddington to Maidenhead, supported by archive photographs on the lines and photographs capturing the human element of the works over the last eight years.
  • BGXWM
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    Post Privatisation Diesels and Electrics is an album of photographs taken by David Cable, a well-regarded author of several books covering trains throughout much of the world. This book looks at the types of locomotives and multiple units that have been introduced into the UK since 1994, when the government privatised British Rail into a series of privately operated franchises. An incredible forty-one classes have been, or are shortly to be introduced, the majority being passenger units. The book shows these classes in a variety of colour schemes adopted by the franchisees. Photographs, in the main, are taken in the South East of England, which is where the great majority of these new trains operate, with the surroundings being given as much prominence as possible.
  • AZOOL
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    Biography of British Train Travel is a collection of mainly previously unpublished articles and short stories, covering a lifelong interest in railways. It spans a wide spectrum over the years, from the early days in Kent in 1960, through the many hours on the lineside on the Surrey Hills line and the South Western main line, to the last frantic years of steam on the Southern, and the current steam scene, as well as the privileged and exciting times spent riding on the footplate of steam locomotives. It majors on the author's main railway passions of steam locomotives, train running performance, including modern motive power and all matters Southern. Locomotive performance in Europe and a tramway are also included, as is a fascinating minor- and little-visited narrow gauge railway in southern England, plus heritage traction on the London Underground.The book comprises approximately 350 illustrations, many in colour, as well as contemporary timetable extracts and copies of notebook pages, which cover shed visits in Scotland. Fifty train running logs are included, together with some detailed records of days spent by the line sides of railways when steam was still the predominant motive power in parts of the south.
  • BKGQC
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    When a 35 mile stretch of the former Waverley route from Edinburgh to Carlisle reopened on 6 September 2015, it became the most significant reopening of any UK railway since the infamous Beeching Report ,'The re-shaping of British Railways', was published in March 1963. In his report, Dr Riochard Beeching recommended sweeping closures of lines across the UK to improve the financial performance of British railways, which led to wholesale closures over the following decade and a reduction in the UK rail network from 18,000 miles in 1963, to some 11,000 miles a decade later. But since that low point was reached in the early 1970s a revolution has been taking place. Passenger traffic on the railways is now at its highest level since the 1940s and from Alloa to Aberdare, as well as from Mansfield to Maesteg, closed lines have reopened and the tide of Beeching closures has been gradually rolled back. Scores of stations have been reopened and on many of the newly revived lines, passenger traffic is far exceeding the forecasts used to support their reopening. In this comprehensive survey of new and reopened railways and stations across England, Scotland and Wales, Gareth David asks what it tells us about Dr Beechings report, looking at how lines that were earmarked for closure in that report, but escaped the axe, have fared and reviews the host of further routes, which are either set to be reopened or are the focus of reopening campaigns.
  • BMPAZ
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    This photographic album portrays the four classes of locomotives introduced to operate on the British Railways system, prior to Privatisation in 1994. Increasing loads and deteriorating reliability of older classes necessitated the design of new, higher horsepower classes of diesel locomotives to operate the increasing requirement to operate trains handling loads in bulk, such as coal, minerals, fuels etc. The four classes included one American design the class 59 which set new standards in haulage capacity and reliability. The other three designs classes 56, 58 and 60 were more suitable to their tasks than previous models, but in the case of the class 56, suffered a poor repuatation for availability for several years, although the few remaining members of the class have now attained acceptable standards. Of the four classes, a small number of class 56s operate in private ownership, all the class 58s have been withdrawn, but all the class 59s and 60s are in daily use throughout England and Wales. This album has been written by David Cable, author of a series of illustrated books covering railways in the UK as well as overseas. The book shows examples of all four classes working a variety of duties at a wide range of locations.
  • BMRFG
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    When Stanier joined the LMS in 1932, as their CME, he was expected to breathe new life into this ailing giant. Since its formation it had steadily lost ground to its main rival, the LNER. In Doncaster, Nigel Gresley and his team, with an eye to advancing locomotive design at the same time as making the company commercially successful, had quickly begun producing a series of high performance and iconic Pacific engines to pull their high profile express trains. Their impact left the LMS trailing in their wake. Under previous CMEs, the LMS had concentrated on 4-6-0 designs to pull their express services, but many felt they lacked sufficient power and had little to offer in performance or glamour when compared to their rivals. Stanier, heavily influenced by his mentor, George Churchward, his work on the GWR and the potential of the Pacific design, saw such a class as essential to the success of the LMS. And so the Princess Royal Class came into being, against a background of some opposition and cultural differences. Despite this, they proved their worth and became popular with their crew and managers. Within a few short years, however, their premier position in the company had been taken by a very worthy successor, the Princess Coronation Class. Overshadowed and often overlooked, they tend to be seen as a stepping stone to something better. Yet, in reality they stand up well to the closest scrutiny, and this book tells the story of these engines through the eyes of those who came into contact with them. They also best represent the impact William Stanier had on locomotive design and best describe the way he changed the culture of the LMS to allow it to grow successfully. It is a story of great endeavor and courage that can only be told by revealing and discussing political, social, economic and engineering issues.
  • ABXXM
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    Much of Scotland's lost railway heritage is still out there waiting to be discovered. Researched and written by respected railway author Julian Holland and profusely illustrated with historical and present-day photographs, "Discovering Scotland's Lost Railways" will open the door to this secret world for the enthusiast as well as those with an interest in Scotland and its transport. Lost railways featured in this book: Dumfries to Stranraer, Connel Ferry to Ballachulish, Spean Bridge to Fort Augustus, Muir of Ord to Fortrose, Boat of Garten to Keith, Elgin to Tillynaught, Banff Inveramsay to Macduff, Kinnaber Junction to Stanley Junction via Forfar Gleneagles to Balquidder, and Dunblane to Crianlarich East Fife Waverley Route.
  • AUJSR
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    There have been tramways in Britain for 150 years, but it is a story of rise, decline and slow renaissance. Trams have come and gone, been loved and hated, popular and derided, considered both old fashioned and futuristic. Horse trams, introduced in the 1860s, were the first cheap form of public transport on city streets. Electric systems were developed in nearly every urban area from the 1890s and revolutionised town travel in the Edwardian era. A century ago, trams were at their peak, used by everyone all over the country and a mark of civic pride in towns and cities from Dover to Dublin. But by the 1930s tramways were in decline and giving way to cheaper and more flexible motor buses and trolleybuses. By the 1950s the major systems were being replaced. London's last tram ran in 1952 and Glasgow, the city most firmly linked with trams, closed its system in 1962. Only Blackpool, famous for its decorated cars, kept a public service running, and trams seemed destined only for preservation in museums. A slow renaissance began in the 1980s, when new systems were introduced as modern 'light rail' networks, starting with the Tyne & Wear Metro (1980) and London's DLR (1987).The latest city to reintroduce trams will be Edinburgh in 2014. Trams are now set to be a familiar and significant feature of urban life once again.
  • AKDKD
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    From the early 1800s and for nearly 170 years, steam locomotives were built in Great Britain and Ireland, by a variety of firms, large and small. James Lowe spent many years accumulating a considerable archive of material on the History of the locomotive building industry, from its early beginnings at the dawn of railways, until the end of steam locomotive construction in the 1960s. British Steam Locomotive Builders was first published in 1975 and has not been in print for some years. This useful and well researched book is a must for any serious railway historian or locomotive enthusiast, 704 pages with reference to 350 builders, 541 illustrations and 47 diagrams. The material in this book has been carefully selected to cover all the leading former steam locomotive manufacturers in the British Isles.
  • AVMDT
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    This book is one in the Pen & Sword Transport History imprint in the 'Locomotive Portfolio' series and covers the family of two-cylinder 4-6-0s designed and built by the Chief Mechanical Engineers of the London & South Western and Southern Railways between 1914 and 1936, which survived well into the era of British Railways. The N15 'King Arthur' class of express passenger engines were the mainstay of the Southern Railway's passenger business between the two world wars, but both Robert Urie and Richard Maunsell built mixed traffic and freight locomotives of a similar ilk forming a 'King Arthur' family of locomotives for all purposes that were simple, robust and long lived. This book describes the conception, design and construction of the N15, H15 and S15 classes and the N15X rebuilds of the LB&SCR 'Baltic Tanks' and their operation in traffic before and after the Second World War, until the withdrawal of the last Maunsell 4-6-0 in 1965.The book includes extensive personal recollections of the author, who both saw and travelled on hundreds of trains hauled by many of these engines in the 1950s and '60s, and gives a brief summary of those that have been preserved on Britain's heritage railways. The book is copiously illustrated with over 200 black and white and colour illustrations.