Art History Books

  • TIQU
    • £7.99
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    The Antiques Roadshow has been a staple of BBC television for 40 years now and is fully deserving of its status as a national institution. This coffee table book celebrates the most incredible finds and stories from the flagship show.

    Paul Atterbury and Marc Allum look back at some of the quintessential moments from the history of the show, revealing hidden secrets and celebrating some of the timeless and priceless finds including 23 original Beatrix Potter drawings, a poignant letter written by a doomed passenger on the Titanic and Marc Bolan of '70s glam rockers T. Rex's Flying V Gibson guitar.

    Beautifully illustrated with stunning photographs throughout, this hardback is a wonderful keepsake of the enduring show's extraordinary objects (including paintings, merchandise and tools) and most memorable moments.
  • ARLW
    • £9.99
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    Learn all about the stories behind 80 of the world's favourite artists and their masterpieces with this incredibly lavish gift book. It talks about artists ranging from Vincent van Gogh and Rembrandt to Andy Warhol and Anish Kapoor and examines their works, influences, developments, friendships, loves and rivalries.

    From Holbein's matchmaking portraits for Henry VIII to Caravaggio's thuggish reactions to a badly cooked artichoke and the romantic affairs of Picasso, this book contains so many lavishly illustrated biographies of incredible artists and looks at the unique techniques, artworks and personalities that made them so legendary.

    An amazing book for art lovers of all ages, this book provides a fascinating overview of so many influential artists in a handy timeline.
  • BEIVI
    Ian Farr
    • £16.89
    • RRP £16.95
    This anthology investigates the turn in art not only towards archives and histories, the relics of modernities past, but toward the phenomena, in themselves, of "haunting" and the activation of memory. It looks at a wide array of artistic relationships to memory association, repetition and reappearance, as well as forms of "active" forgetting. Its discussions encompass artworks from the late 1940s onward, ranging from reperformances such as Marina Abramovic's Seven Easy Pieces (embodied resurrections of decades-removed performance pieces by her contemporaries) to the inanimate trace of "memory" Robert Morris assigns to his free-form felt pieces, which "forget" in their present configurations their previous slides and falls. Contextualizing memory's role in visual theory and aesthetic politics - from Marcel Proust's optics to Bernard Stiegler's analysis of memory's "industrialization" - this collection also surveys the diversity of situations and registers in which contemporary artists explore memory.Art that engages with memory embodied in material and spatial conditions is examined beside works that reflect upon memory's effects through time, and yet others that enlist the agency of remembrance or forgetting to work through aspects of the numerous pasts by which the present is always haunted. Artists surveyed include: Marina Abramovic, Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Kutlug Ataman, Uta Barth, Tom Burr, Sophie Calle, Joseph Cornell, Tacita Dean, Stan Douglas, Cheryl Dunye, Kota Ezawa, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Rodney Graham, Richard Hamilton, Sharon Hayes, Susan Hiller, Roni Horn, Pierre Huyghe, Amar Kanwar, William Kentridge, Idris Khan, Zoe Leonard, Ilan Lieberman, Glenn Ligon, Elizabeth Manchester, Robert Morris, Rabih Mroue, Uriel Orlow, Walid Raad, Anri Sala, Fazal Sheikh, Lorna Simpson, Vivan Sundaram, Jane and Louise Wilson. Writers include Gaston Bachelard, Daniel Birnbaum, Andre Breton, Nicolas Bourriaud, Victor Burgin, Johanna Burton, Tom Burr, Helene Cixous, Joseph Cornell, T.J.Demos, Gilles Deleuze, Ollivier Dyens Okwui Enwezor, Briony Fer, Hal Foster, Maurice Halbwachs, Richard Hamilton, Margaret Iversen, Martin Jay, Siegfried Kracauer, Abigail Levine, Tom McDonough, Roger Malbert, Robert Morris, Rabih Mroue, Michael Newman, Pierre Nora, Georges Perec, Peggy Phelan, Pil & Galia Kollectiv, Megan Ratner, Hans Rudolf Reust, Paul Ricoeur, Lisa Saltzman, Lauren Sedofsky, Roger Shattuck, Michael Sheringham, Bernard Stiegler, Peter Suchin, Margaret Sundell and Jan Verwoert.
  • BBQXT
    • £49.39
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    In a lively re-examination of the British collectors who bankrupted themselves to possess antique marble statues, Owning the Past chronicles a story of pride, rivalry, snobbery, and myopic obsession with posterity and possession. Analyzing the motives that drove "Marble Mania" in England from the 17th through the early 19th century, Ruth Guilding examines how the trend of collecting antique sculpture entrenches the ideals of connoisseurship and taste, exacerbates socioeconomic inequities, and serves nationalist propaganda. Even today, for the individuals or regimes that possess them, classical statuary performs as a symbol of authority or as the trophies of a "civilized" power. From Adolf Hitler posing for the press beside an ancient copy of Myron's Discobolus to the 2002 sale of the Newby Venus for a record price of about $13 million to the Emir of Qatar, marble mania remains unabated. With insider access to private collections, Guilding writes with verve and searing insight into this absorbing fixation.
  • BBRZL
    • £31.20
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    In 1761, Bernardo Bellotto painted his famous panorama of Munich, signing the painting Canaletto as he signed many of his paintingsin tribute to his uncle and teacher Giovanni Antonio Canal. In addition to the famous panorama, Bellotto completed over the course of several months two stunning palace views for the Duke of Bavaria, Maximilian III Joseph. Placing Bellotto s Munich paintings within the artist s broader body of work, this well-illustrated book highlights the Italian painter and printmaker s capacity to create paintings of European cities that are both remarkably realistic and compositionally idealistic. Depicting Dresden, Vienna, Turin, and Warsaw, the paintings demonstrate an elaborate attention to architectural and natural detail and a sophisticated understanding of the specific quality of light in each place. By juxtaposing the paintings with Bellotto s preparatory sketches, the book also sheds light on his complicated process, which is thought to have included the use of the popular optical aid of that time, the camera obscura. Rounding out the book is a contemporary artistic reevaluation of the paintings through the medium of photography. Bringing together many well-known works by the Venetian "vedute" with a trove of paintings rarely seen, including a series of highly idealized architectural depictions, the book illustrates his critical contribution to this important European tradition."
  • BBSAO
    • £45.00
    This fully illustrated study of the life and work of Scottish artist Craigie Aitchison (1926-2009) is the first book to cover the entire oeuvre of a painter whose distinctive and powerfully evocative style has earned him widespread public and critical acclaim. Award-winning writer Cate Haste draws for the first time on family archives, letters, published interviews with the painter, and new interviews with those who knew Aitchison to explore the relationship of his life to his work, the influences which shaped his visual imagination, the emergence of his distinctive themes, and the development of his painting style. Craigie Aitchison was born in Edinburgh and studied at the Slade School of Art under William Coldstream and Robert Medley. In 1954 he was one of 'Six Young Contemporaries' who showed at Gimpel Fils gallery in London, and the following year he was awarded a British Council Scholarship to study in Italy. His encounter with the exuberance of Catholic churches and Quattrocento frescoes and the vivid colours of the Tuscan landscape had a profound influence on his art. Later, he exhibited alongside the major figures of his day - Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud, Frank Auerbach, Euan Uglow and Michael Andrews. His commissioned work included a Calvary for Liverpool Anglican Cathedral, four panels for Truro Cathedral, Cornwall, a Christmas Millennium stamp for the Royal Mail, and stage designs for Northern Ballet. He also designed neck-ties, fabrics and ceramics for the Royal Academy. At the centre of Aitchison's poetic vision was his sophisticated use of colour and shape, giving eloquent meaning to his deceptively simple subjects and his distillation of each image - still-life, crucifixion, landscape, portrait - to its very essence of beauty. Cate Haste's highly readable account will be widely welcomed by the many admirers and collectors of the work of an extraordinary artist.
  • BBXMN
    • £25.79
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    'One should try to see health and disease in light of the theory of colour.' -- Rudolf Steiner This book is the result the of the author's adventure in painting and work with Liane Collot d'Herbois (1907-1999), the well-known artist and therapist who worked in the tradition of Rudolf Steiner's spiritual research. It follows Marie-Laure's journey of self-discovery after meeting Liane for the first time, and goes on to describe Collot D'Herbois' teaching and the effects of particular colours and materials to explore light and dark.
  • BBRYN
    • £38.00
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    Between 1777 and 1784, the Irish artist James Barry (1741-1806) executed six murals for the Great Room of the [Royal] Society of Arts in London. Although his works form the most impressive series of history paintings in Great Britain, they remain one of the British art world's best kept secrets, having attracted little attention from critics or the general public. James Barry's Murals at the Royal Society of Arts is the first to offer an in-depth analysis of these remarkable paintings and the first to demonstrate that the artist was pioneering a new approach to public art in terms of the novelty of the patronage and the highly personal nature of his content. Barry insisted on, and received, complete control over his subject matter, the first time in the history of Western art that the patron of a large, impressive interior agreed to such a demand. The artist required autonomy in order to present his personal vision, which encompasses a rich and complex surface narrative as well as a hidden meaning that has gone unperceived for 230 years. The artist disguised his deeper message due to its inflammatory nature. Were his meaning readily apparent, the Society would have thrown out him and his murals. Ultimately, as this book seeks to show, the artist intended his paintings to engage the public in a dialogue that would utterly transform British society in terms of its culture, politics, and religion. In making this case, the book brings this neglected series into the mainstream of discussions of British art of the Romantic period, revealing the intellectual profundity invested in the genre of history painting and re-evaluating the role Christianity played in Enlightenment thought.
  • BBZLE
    • £16.10
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    Documentary has undergone a marked revival in recent art, following a long period in which it was a denigrated and unfashionable practice. This has in part been led by the exhibition of photographic and video work on political issues at Documenta and numerous biennials and, since the turn of the century, issues of injustice, violence and trauma in increasing zones of conflict. Aesthetically, documentary is now one of the most prominent modes of art-making, in part assisted by the linked transformation and recuperation of photography and video by the gallery and museum world. Unsurprisingly, this development, along with the close attention paid to photojournalism and mainstream documentary-making in a time of crisis, has been accompanied by a rich strain of theoretical and historical writing on documentary. This anthology provides a definitive historical context for documentary, exploring its roots in modernism and its critique under postmodernism; it surveys current theoretical thinking about documentary; and it examines a wide range of work by artists within, around or against documentary through their own writings and interviews.Artists surveyed include Kutlug Ataman, Ursula Biemann, Hasan Elahi, Harun Farocki, Omer Fast, Joan Fontcuberta, Regina Jose Galindo, David Goldblatt, Alfredo Jaar, Emily Jacir, Lisa F. Jackson, Philip Jones Griffiths, An-My Le, Renzo Martens, Boris Mikhailov, Daido Moriyama, Walid Raad, Michael Schmidt and Sean Snyder. Writers include James Agee, Ariella Azoulay, Walter Benjamin, Adam Broomberg, Judith Butler, Oliver Chanarin, Georges Didi-Huberman, John Grierson, David Levi Strauss, Elizabeth McCausland, Carl Plantinga, Jacques Ranciere, Martha Rosler, Jean-Paul Sartre, Allan Sekula, Susan Sontag, Hito Steyerl and Trinh T. Minh-ha.
  • BCALO
    • £50.89
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    In this groundbreaking study, first published in 1983 and unavailable for over a decade, Linda Dalrymple Henderson demonstrates that two concepts of space beyond immediate perception -- the curved spaces of non-Euclidean geometry and, most important, a higher, fourth dimension of space -- were central to the development of modern art. The possibility of a spatial fourth dimension suggested that our world might be merely a shadow or section of a higher dimensional existence. That iconoclastic idea encouraged radical innovation by a variety of early twentieth-century artists, ranging from French Cubists, Italian Futurists, and Marcel Duchamp, to Max Weber, Kazimir Malevich, and the artists of De Stijl and Surrealism. In an extensive new Reintroduction, Henderson surveys the impact of interest in higher dimensions of space in art and culture from the 1950s to 2000. Although largely eclipsed by relativity theory beginning in the 1920s, the spatial fourth dimension experienced a resurgence during the later 1950s and 1960s. In a remarkable turn of events, it has returned as an important theme in contemporary culture in the wake of the emergence in the 1980s of both string theory in physics (with its ten- or eleven-dimensional universes) and computer graphics. Henderson demonstrates the importance of this new conception of space for figures ranging from Buckminster Fuller, Robert Smithson, and the Park Place Gallery group in the 1960s to Tony Robbin and digital architect Marcos Novak.
  • BAFRI
    • £41.89
    • RRP £41.95
    Beginning with responses to fascism in the 1930s and ending with protests against the Iraq wars, David McCarthy shows how American artists - including Philip Evergood, David Smith, H. C. Westermann, Ed Kienholz, Nancy Spero, Leon Golub, Chris Burden, Robert Arneson, Joyce Kozloff, Martha Rosler, and Coco Fusco-have borne witness, registered dissent, and asserted the enduring ability of imagination to uncover truths about individuals and nations. During what has been called the American Century, the United States engaged in frequent combat overseas while developing technologies of unprecedented lethality. Many artists, working collectively or individually, produced antiwar art to protest the use or threat of military violence in the service of an expansionist state. In so doing, they understood themselves to be fighting on behalf of two liberal beliefs: that their country was the guarantor of liberty against empire, and that modern art was a viable means of addressing the most compelling events and issues of the moment. For many artists, creative work was a way to participate in democratic exchange by challenging and clarifying government and media perspectives on armed conflict. Charting a seventy-five-year history of antiwar art and activism, American Artists against War, 1935-2010 lucidly tracks the continuities, preoccupations, and strategies of several generations.
  • BAGHE
    • £13.49
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    Published for the first time in paperback, this best selling book shows London as represented by Edward Bawden (1903 - 1989) in prints, posters, drawings, paintings, murals and advertising material produced during his long career. The wide range of illustrations includes early work executed whilst a student in the early 1920s; the Morley College murals carried out in partnership with Eric Ravilious; advertising work for London Transport, Fortnum & Mason, Twinings Teas, Shell, Westminster Bank; the mural for the Lion & Unicorn Pavilion at the 1951 Festival of Britain; and a varied selection of his finest series of linocuts - including London Monuments and London Markets.
  • BAGSF
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    Sparse landscapes of Lake Superior's northern shores, bold visions of the Rocky Mountains and haunting landscapes from the Eastern Arctic are hallmark themes of Lawren Harris's paintings. He was a founding member of the renowned "Group of Seven" artists' group, who believed that the Canadian landscape was central to the foundation of a national identity. Focusing on Harris's most important work of the 1920s through the early 1930s, this monograph features a selection of major works that are as iconic in Canada as those of Georgia O'Keeffe and Edward Hopper in the U.S. His remarkable use of colour, light and composition resulted in powerful scenes that reflect his progress toward a universal vision of nature's spiritual power. Drawn from the Art Gallery of Ontario's substantial holdings as well as other public collections throughout Canada, this publication repositions Harris's work and establishes him as a major figure within the wider context of 20th-century modern painting in the Americas. Published in association with the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles and the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto.
  • BAHNX
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    If Hieronymus Bosch (1450-1516) remains an enigma today, it is little wonder. Even his contemporaries found the Netherlandish painter's work difficult to Decipher - and it still presents riddles to contemporary art historians. Part of the problem in decoding his shocking and richly allegorical paintings is that virtually nothing is known of the artist himself, apart from his birthplace. There is no record of his life or training, no personal letters, diaries or notebooks, and no contemporary insights into his personality or thoughts on the meaning of his art. Even his date of birth can only be guessed at, and that based on a drawing assumed to be a self-portrait, made shortly before his death in 1516, which supposedly shows the artist in his late sixties. Bosch remains as mysterious as the worlds he painted. Although rooted in the Old Netherlandish tradition, Bosch developed a highly subjective, richly suggestive formal language. With a mixture of religious humility and satanic wit, he illustrated both the joys of heaven and the cruelly imaginative tortures of hell. In his pictorial world teeming with surrealistic nightmares, the medieval imagination catches fire in a moment of final brilliance before succumbing to humanism and modern rationalism. Though the man himself remains a mystery, this book pulls together the elusive threads of Bosch's entire oeuvre into a cohesive and comprehensive analysis of his visionary work and methods.
  • BAJRN
    • £22.49
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    In 1925 the artists Edward Bawden and Eric Ravilious moved to the Essex village of Great Bardfield, at first sharing lodgings. Over the course of several years and encouraged by Bawden and Ravilious' work, other artists came to live in the village, forming a community of artists and designers that has continued to the present. Among the first to join them were the Rowntrees, Kenneth and Diana, and Michael Rothenstein and his wife Duffy Ayers. They were followed by John Aldridge, painter and designer of wallpapers (printed, like Bawden's papers, by the Curwen Press); Walter Hoyle, printmaker and also a wallpaper designer; Marianne Straub, textile designer and weaver; illustrators and printmakers Bernard Cheese and his wife Sheila Robinson. Though the careers of Bawden and Ravilious are well-documented, many of the other artists are less well-known but equally talented, such as George Chapman, Stanley Clifford-Smith and Laurence Scarfe.This book tells the story of Great Bardfield and its artists, and their famous 'open house' exhibitions, showing how the village and neighbouring landscape nurtured a distinctive style of art, design and illustration from the 1930s to the 1970s and beyond. '..their shared artistic legacy is immediately obvious from this beautiful book.' --Country Life 16th 23rd December 2015'..Beautifully designed.' --Evening Standard 24th December 2015'..splendidly illustrated' -- The Spectator, 28th November 2015
  • BAKMA
    • £51.69
    • RRP £65.00
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    As artists, Joseph, Franz and Ferdinand Bauer were independently highly successful: Joseph as court painter to the Prince of Lichtenstein; Franz (later Francis) was employed at Kew Gardens, England, as the Botanick Painter to His Majesty; and Ferdinand s seminal collection of 1500 paintings created from sketches he made traveling in and around Australia, is the first detailed account of the natural history of that continent. Drawn from the holdings of the Natural History Museum in London, this illustrated history of the Bauers and their work unfolds chronologically, starting with the brothers formative years in Feldsberg, Austria, where they produced more than two thousand drawings of plant specimens under the guidance of the local abbot. Learning how to dissect plants as well as how to use microscopes to paint them in intricate detail, the Bauers became well known for their extraordinary precision. Their incredibly detailed work, along with their beautiful and highly developed methods of colouring their paintings, comes to life in numerous superbly reproduced illustrations. A celebration of an indelible body of work, this unique volume recalls the Golden Age of botanical artistry through the lives and contributions of the renowned Bauer brothers.
  • BAKLC
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    The tender roots of Modern Art can be seen in the wild sea paintings of Turner, as early as the mid 19th Century, but it took the Impressionists and the Pre-Raphaelites to break the elite classical mode, until the final blows were dealt in the early 1900s by Kandinsky, Klee and Picasso. Modern Art was a reaction to the gathering pace of industrialisation of the late Victorian world, and the desire for art that looked forwards not behind to classical myth and legend. But once the beast of modernism had been unleashed it fragmented into many different forms, each of which are explored in this striking, heavily illustrated new book.
  • BAMQG
    • £35.00
    Irish-born designer Eileen Gray (1878-1976) is widely known today as a pioneer of both Art Deco and Modernism. In a career spanning nearly 80 years she produced innovative designs for furniture, lighting, carpets, interiors and architecture. Much less well known is that throughout her life as a designer and an architect she never stopped producing small paintings and drawings. This book is the first to focus on Eileen Gray's important but essentially private work as a painter. Eileen Gray considered herself a designer and an architect, not a painter: she viewed her work as a painter with great modesty, treating it as a private occupation and a vehicle for artistic expression during periods when she could not design furniture. Much of her artwork has disappeared, either lost in the Second World War or destroyed by the artist herself. But a body of works on paper, produced between the 1920s and the 1950s, has survived: elegant, geometric drawings and gouaches of muted tonality and subtle power. This book, which reproduces unseen material from the Eileen Gray archive and draws on Gray's correspondence with her niece Prunella Clough on the nature of painting, will be a revelation to her many followers and admirers.
  • BAMVN
    • £36.00
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    The most complete book to date on Mariano Fortuny (1871 - 1949) - painter, etcher, photographer, set designer, reformer of theatrical stage lighting, inventor and designer of furniture and fashion. Mariano Fortuny was a visionary designer and artist - best known today for his rich, innovative textiles and opulent dress designs, he was also an accomplished painter, etcher and photographer, as well as a designer of theatrical sets, costumes and lighting, revolutionising the stagecraft of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries with his ambitious lighting designs. Fortuny's varied and sumptuous output has acquired almost mythological status in the canon of early twentieth-century Aestheticism. Guillermo de Osma sets out to provide a complete and authoritative account of his life and work.
  • BANFN
    • £28.00
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    The peerless and comprehensive survey of this important American artist, now available in paperback for the first time This thoroughly researched, immensely readable study on Winslow Homer, one of America's most significant and prolific painters, presents a full account of his life and work and offers a fresh and provocative reassessment of his place in the history of late nineteenth-century art. Homer's work is popular and accessible, and Griffin's text, with its solid documentation, original research and fresh interpretations, has become an essential survey of Homer and his creative output.
  • BAPDB
    • £22.50
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    Published to accompany the landmark opening of the V&A's new Europe 1600 - 1800 galleries, The Arts of Living explores the breadth, depth and beauty of the V&A's seventeenth- and eighteenth-century collections. Written by a team of experts, this book provides an overview of more than two centuries of cultural development and artistic endeavour. Masterpieces such as the Serilly Cabinet and Gian Lorenzo Bernini's terracotta for his funeral monument the Blessed Ludovica Albertoni are contextualized alongside discussions of Louis XIV's patronage and the seventeenth-century Dutch interior. Many works are shown for the first time, including Count Bru?hl's Meissen fountain and actor David Garrick's tea service.
  • BAACG
    • £54.95
    In Istanbul Exchanges, Mary Roberts offers an innovative way of understanding Orientalism by shifting the focus from Europe to Istanbul and examining the cross-cultural artistic networks that emerged in that cosmopolitan capital in the nineteenth century. European Orientalist artists began traveling to Istanbul in greater numbers in this period, just as the Ottoman elite was becoming more engaged with European art. By the 1870s, a generation of Paris-trained Ottoman artists had returned to Istanbul with ambitions to reshape the visual arts. Drawing on materials from an array of international archives, Roberts reveals that the diverse cultures and motivations that coalesced in this vibrant milieu resulted in a complex web of alliances and exchanges. With many artistic initiatives receiving patronage both from foreign diplomatic communities and from the Ottoman court, visual culture became a significant resource for articulating modern Ottoman identity. Roberts recasts the terms in which the nexus of Orientalist art and the culture of the late Ottoman Empire are understood by charting the nodes and vectors of these international artistic networks. Istanbul Exchanges is a major contribution to the transnational study of modern visual culture and global histories of art.
  • BAAVL
    • £23.96
    • RRP £29.95
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    German designer and educator, Otl Aicher, was a pioneer of twentieth century graphic design, renowned for creating visual identities for numerous corporations (including Lufthansa, FSB, and ERCO) and his work on symbol systems. Aicher, inspired by his design system for the Munich Olympics in 1972, worked for over twenty years to create a completely visual language and is often referred to as the "father of modern pictograms." Born after World War I and raised during the takeover of the Nazi party in Germany, Aicher often used design as a method of political resistance and tool of social equality. He is known as much for his design philosophies as his completed work. He educated a generation future designers at the Hochschule fur Gestaltung (HfG) in Ulm, Germany, the school he helped found in the 1950s and 60s. Late in life, Aicher collaborated repeatedly with British architect Norman Foster on designs for public buildings, integrating his interest in design with public planning. Aicher died in a car crash in 1991.
  • BABEM
    • £24.89
    • RRP £25.00
    In 1915, Churchill was forced to resign from the wartime British government. He was 40 years old and thought his political career was finished. He became deeply depressed, but was rescued during a family holiday by his discovery of the 'muse of painting'. Churchill's fascination with painting continued until his last years, and for the first time, this book tells the story of this life through his own pictures.