History of Architecture Books

  • Metropolis - Hardback - 9781844862207 - Professor Jeremy Black
    Professor Jeremy Black
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    Discover how the city was imagined in maps from ancient times through to the modern day in Jeremy Black's Metropolis: Mapping the City.

    This is a fascinating look at the history of cities through the eyes of the cartographers who mapped their streets. Packed with more than 150 maps, charts and illustrations, the beautiful book reveals how our urban spaces have evolved.
    John Newman
    • £35.00
    The exceptionally rich architecture of eastern Kent is covered by this fully revised, updated, and expanded edition of John Newman's classic survey, first published in 1969. This city of Canterbury is the county's greatest treasure, and its glorious cathedral is the first mature example of Gothic architecture in England. The influence of Canterbury appears also in the remains of St Augustine's 17th-century mission churches, and in sophisticated Norman carved work at churches such as Barfrestone. Kent is also a maritime county, and its coastal towns are excitingly diverse: the royal stronghold of Dover with its mighty medieval castle; the medieval port of Sandwich; and resorts large and small, from genteel Folkestone to lively Margate, with its bold new art gallery.
    Robert Scourfield
    • £35.00
    The historic counties of Montgomeryshire, Radnorshire, and Breconshire are described in this final volume of the Buildings of Wales series, expanded and revised from the first edition of 1979. Prehistoric hill-forts and standing stones, Roman encampments, Early Christian monuments, ruined castles and the enigmatic remains of early industry enhance the landscapes of this wild and beautiful region. Atmospheric medieval churches survive in quantity, together with diverse Nonconformist chapels. Vernacular traditions are represented by robust medieval cruck-framed houses, and by the manor houses and farmhouses of the Tudors and Stuarts. Other highlights include Montgomery, with its beguiling Georgian heritage, the Victorian spa at Llandrindod Wells, and Powis Castle, with its Baroque interiors and terraced gardens.
    Matthew Slocombe
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    Although steel and glass dominate modern cities, Britain boasts innumerable beautiful examples of more traditional construction methods. Many date from the period before easy nationwide transportation, when materials were usually grown or extracted locally, and as a result Britain has a varied legacy of vernacular buildings that reflects its multitude of different landscapes. They display a rich and colorful palette of materials, from the honey-colored stone of the Cotswolds to the red earth of Devon and grey granite of Aberdeen. In this book, buildings historian Matthew Slocombe looks at the range of materials used for walls and roof coverings, explores the processes involved in their extraction, production and manufacture, and outlines the diverse range of skills required for their use in construction.
    Albert Hill
    • £26.89
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    An unprecedented homage to modernist architecture from the 1920s up to the present day Ornament Is Crime is a celebration and a thought-provoking reappraisal of modernist architecture. The book proposes that modernism need no longer be confined by traditional definitions, and can be seen in both the iconic works of the modernist canon by Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, and Walter Gropius, as well as in the work of some of the best contemporary architects of the twenty-first century. This book is a visual manifesto and a celebration of the most important architectural movement in modern history.
    John Gifford
    • £35.00
    This volume in the Buildings of Scotland series explores the rich architectural diversity of Dundee and Angus. Dundee, the fourth-largest city in Scotland, boasts some of the country's finest ecclesiastical, public, industrial, and commercial buildings, including the unique Maggie's Centre designed by Frank Gehry. Beyond Dundee lies the predominantly rural county of Angus, where visitors can see stunning Pictish and early Christian monuments, castles, country houses, and the famed Bell Rock Lighthouse, the world's oldest surviving sea-washed lighthouse.
    Alan Brooks
    • £35.00
    Rich in new discoveries and fresh interpretation, this fully revised survey is the perfect companion and guide to one of England's most beguiling counties. A profusion of black-and-white timber-framed houses testifies to the prosperity of earlier centuries, as do the many and varied parish churches. Highlights among these include the extraordinary Norman carvings at Kilpeck, the exquisitely spare Cistercian architecture of Abbey Dore, the seductive Georgian Gothick of Shobdon, and Lethaby's Arts and Crafts masterpiece at Brockhampton. The city of Hereford is freshly presented in detail, from its splendid medieval cathedral to the architectural adventures of the Georgians and Victorians. Country houses are plentiful and diverse, including much that is well in step with national fashions. The characteristic landscape of hills and woods lends a special pleasure to architectural exploration, while market towns such as Ledbury, Leominster, and Ross-on-Wye can match any in England for visual and architectural appeal.
    Ca Tf Editores
    • £19.79
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    The Alhambra, one of the most-visited places in Spain, was declared a Monument in 1870, shortly after the enactment of Spain's first Monuments Law. Long before that, however, it was the subject of interest of all the travellers visiting the southern part of the Iberian Peninsula. In 1984 it was named a UNESCO World Heritage site, a well-deserved recognition of its interesting historical, aesthetic and natural treasures. The Monumental Complex - which comprises the area enclosed by its walls, the land where the Generalife is located, and the large surrounding area where there are buildings as well as the remains of other constructions historically associated with the Alhambra - is a unique place in the world. Not only does the Monument never disappoint those who visit it, visitors take away with them the feeling of needing to visit it again and again.
    Pier Vittorio Aureli
    • £23.95
    In The Possibility of an Absolute Architecture, Pier Vittorio Aureli proposes that a sharpened formal consciousness in architecture is a precondition for political, cultural, and social engagement with the city. Aureli uses the term absolute not in the conventional sense of "pure," but to denote something that is resolutely itself after being separated from its other. In the pursuit of the possibility of an absolute architecture, the other is the space of the city, its extensive organization, and its government. Politics is agonism through separation and confrontation; the very condition of architectural form is to separate and be separated. Through its act of separation and being separated, architecture reveals at once the essence of the city and the essence of itself as political form: the city as the composition of (separate) parts. Aureli revisits the work of four architects whose projects were advanced through the making of architectural form but whose concern was the city at large: Andrea Palladio, Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Etienne Louis-Boullee, and Oswald Mathias Ungers. The work of these architects, Aureli argues, addressed the transformations of the modern city and its urban implications through the elaboration of specific and strategic architectural forms. Their projects for the city do not take the form of an overall plan but are expressed as an "archipelago" of site-specific interventions.
    Clare Hartwell
    • £35.00
    A comprehensive guide to the buildings of Cheshire in all their variety, from Pennine villages to coastal plains and seaside resorts. Chester, the regional capital and cathedral city, is famous for its Roman walls and black-and-white timber architecture, its noble Neoclassical monuments, and its unique medieval shopping 'rows' with their upper walkways. But Cheshire is also a major industrial county, with spectacular and internationally significant mills and canal structures. Specialist settlements include the famous railway borough of Crewe, the salt towns of Nantwich, Northwich and Middlewich, and Lord Leverhulme's celebrated garden suburb at Port Sunlight.
    Frank Lloyd Wright
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    He was the most iconoclastic of architects, and at the height of his career his output of writings about architecture was as prolific and visionary as his architecture itself. Frank Lloyd Wright pioneered a bold new kind of architecture, one in which the spirit of modern man truly "lived in his buildings." The Essential Frank Lloyd Wright is a one-volume compendium of Wright's most critically important--and personally revealing--writings on every conceivable aspect of his craft. Wright was perhaps the most influential and inspired architect of the twentieth century, and this is the only book that gathers all of his most significant essays, lectures, and articles on architecture. Bruce Pfeiffer includes each piece in its entirety to present the architect's writings as he originally intended them. Beginning early in Wright's career with "The Art and Craft of the Machine" in 1901, the book follows major themes through The Disappearing City, The Natural House, and many other writings, and ends with A Testament in 1957, published two years before his death. This volume is beautifully illustrated with original drawings and photographs, and is complemented by Pfeiffer's general introduction, which provides history and context. The Essential Frank Lloyd Wright is a must-have resource for architects and scholars and a delight for general readers.
    • £12.09
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    "The World's Greatest Architecture" offers a panoramic view of nearly 300 individual buildings, each recognized as great buildings, from the earliest times to the present, and from every culture, including those, the majority of non-western cultures, where the division between art and craft are less likely to be distinguished. Focusing mainly on large, spectacular or monumental buildings - cathedrals and skyscrapers, for instance - the subjects are arranged first by geographical region and second by chronology within each chapter. Chapters are organized by periods. Learn about architecture in the ancient world, including Stonehenge, the great pyramids and Machu Piccu, the medieval world, including Windsor Castle, Notre Dame and Strasbourg Cathedral, the 20th century including Grand Central Station, Selfridge's Department Store and the Pompidou Centre and more. Whether you are a seasoned lover of architecture or relatively new to the field, D. M. Field's tome will prove a wonderful, photographic addition to your home library. This is an extensive guide to the world's greatest architectural feats spanning from the ancient world to the 20th century. It is illustrated with over 600 photographs of all sorts of structures from Stonehenge to Grand Central Station. It includes a glossary of architectural terms.
    Richard Weston
    • £23.20
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    Featuring more than 100 of the most significant and influential buildings of the twentieth century, this book includes both classic works by such seminal architects as Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, Mies van der Rohe and Alvar Aalto, as well as those by more recent masters, such as Norman Foster, Frank Gehry and Rem Koolhaas. For each of the buildings included there are numerous, accurate scale plans showing each floor, together with elevations, sections and site plans where appropriate. All of these have been specially commissioned for the book and are based on the most up-to-date information and sources. There is also a concise text explaining the significant architectural features of the building and the influences it shows or generated, together with full-colour images. Cross-references to other buildings in the book highlight the various connections between these key structures. This second edition features 8 new buildings, and 16 additional pages. It also has some additions to the information and images on many of the buildings from the first edition. It has a new introduction and a new jacket.
    Dale F. Cahill
    • £21.99
    In recent years, over one thousand tobacco sheds have disappeared from the "Tobacco Valley". This important book systematically catalogues tobacco sheds from Putney, Vermont, to Portland, Connecticut, a span of just over one hundred miles. The photographs capture the beauty of these unique farm buildings and serve as a valuable record for these endangered barns. The text offers the agricultural history of each town, helping to connect sheds to their own unique region of New England. In addition, the book reinforces the need for preserving one of New England's most unusual farm structures. Many sheds in the Connecticut River Valley are still used to dry tobacco leaves that will wrap some of the world's most expensive cigars, but, sadly, some are being left to slowly deteriorate over time or are being torn down to make way for development. This book will be treasured by cigar smokers and architectural historians and preservationists alike.
    Paul Chrystal
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
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    From its days as a major fishing and whaling port, through Second World War bomb damage and post-industrial decline to its current status as UK City of Culture for 2017, Hull has a proud and distinctive identity. This extraordinary history is embodied in the buildings that have shaped the city. Hull in 50 Buildings explores the history of this rich and vibrant community through a selection of its greatest architectural treasures. From the recently renovated Edwardian Trinity Market to the new St Stephen's Hull theatre development, this unique study celebrates the city's architectural heritage in a new and accessible way. Author Paul Chrystal guides the reader on a tour of the city's historic buildings and modern architectural marvels.
    Michael Sagar-Fenton
    • £11.99
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    From the granting of Burgh status by King James I in 1614 through its growth and development as a fashionable seaside resort, the West Cornwall town of Penzance has a proud and distinctive identity. This extraordinary history is embodied in the many fine buildings that have shaped this historic port. Penzance in 50 Buildings examines the proud and distinctive history of the town through a selection of its greatest architectural treasures. From the eccentric early nineteenth-century Egyptian House to the cutting edge Exchange Gallery, opened in 2007, this unique study celebrates the town's architectural heritage in a new and accessible way. Local author and historian Mike Sagar-Fenton guides the reader on a tour of the town's historic buildings and modern architectural marvels.
    Robin Ward
    • £15.29
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    Glasgow is one of the most architecturally exciting cities in the world, boasting a huge variety of building styles. There are grand Victorian public buildings celebrating civic progress and pride, commercial palazzi glorifying trade and industry, glittering art galleries, a Gothic Revival university as well as tower blocks, tenements, the Art Nouveau of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the quirky classicism of Alexander 'Greek' Thomson.This book illustrates and describes almost 500 buildings and structures, featured not only for their architectural excellence but also for their social and historical significance.
    Shundana Yusaf
    • £25.95
    In the years between the world wars, millions of people heard the world through a box on the dresser. In Britain, radio listeners relied on the British Broadcasting Corporation for information on everything from interior decoration to Hitler's rise to power. One subject covered regularly on the wireless was architecture and the built environment. Between 1927 and 1945, the BBC aired more than six hundred programs on this topic, published a similar number of articles in its magazine, The Listener, and sponsored several traveling exhibitions. In this book, Shundana Yusaf examines the ways that broadcasting placed architecture at the heart of debates on democracy. Undaunted by the challenge of talking about space and place in disembodied voices over a nonvisual medium, designers and critics turned the wireless into an arena for debates about the definitions of the architect and architecture, the difficulties of town and country planning after the breakup of large country estates, the financing of the luxury market, the expansion of local governing power, and tourism. Yusaf argues that while broadcast technology made a decisive break with the Victorian world, these broadcasts reflected the BBC's desire to continue the legacy of Victorian institutions dedicated to the production of a cultivated polity. Under the leadership of John Reith, the BBC introduced listeners to the higher pleasures of life hoping to deepen their respect for tradition, the authority of the state, and national interests. These ambitions influenced the way architecture was portrayed on the air. Yusaf finds that the wireless evoked historic architecture only in travelogues and contemporary design mainly in shopping advice. The BBC's architectural programming, she argues, offered a paradoxical interface between the placelessness of radio and the situatedness of architecture, between the mechanical or nonhumanistic impulses of technology and the humanist conception of architecture.
    Bill Addis
    • £23.96
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    From Egypt and Classical Greece and Rome through the building booms of the Gothic era and the Renaissance, and from the Industrial Revolution to the present era of digital modeling, Building: 3,000 Years of Design, Engineering, and Construction, charts centuries of innovations in engineering and building construction. This comprehensive and heavily illustrated volume, aimed at students and young professionals as well as general readers, explores the materials, classic texts, instruments, and theories that have propelled modern engineering, and the famous and not-so-famous buildings designed through the ages, from the Parthenon to Chartres Cathedral and the dome of St. Peter's, from eighteenth-century silk mills in England to the Crystal Palace, and on to the first Chicago high-rises, the Sydney Opera House, and the latest "green" skyscrapers. The book concentrates on developments since the industrial and scientific revolutions of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Incorporated within the continuous narrative are sidebars with short biographies of eminent engineers, excerpts from classic texts, stories of individual projects of major importance, and brief histories of key concepts such as calculus. Also included are extensive reference materials: appendices, a glossary, bibliography, and index.
    Peter Beacham
    • £35.00
    Cornwall was the first volume in the Buildings of England series, published in 1951. This extensively revised edition brings much new research to bear on the history of the county's buildings, beginning with its rich prehistoric remains and early Christian structures and monuments including numerous Celtic crosses and holy wells. The high towers of the village churches, manor houses such as Cotehele, and the distinctive white-walled cottages in the villages and fishing towns contribute to Cornwall's unique, picturesque landscape. Cornwall is home to major country houses, including the spectacular castle of St Michael's Mount, as well as the greatest English cathedral of the Victorian age at Truro. The architectural legacy of industry is also of considerable importance, from the net houses of the fishing industry to the tapering engine-house chimneys of the tin mines.
    Elisabeth Blanchett
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    At the end of the Second World War Winston Churchill promised to manufacture half a million prefabricated bungalows to ease the housing shortage; in the end more than 156,000 temporary 'prefabs' were delivered. Nicknamed 'Palaces for the People', and with convenient kitchens, bathrooms and heating systems, they proved popular and instead of being demolished as intended they were defended by residents who campaigned to keep their family homes and communities. Nearly seventy years later, as the last of these two bedroom homes are being demolished, Elisabeth Blanchet tells the story of these popular dwellings and their gardens and shows the various designs that were produced. Through the stories and memories of residents, she also reveals the communities who were pleased to live in the prefabs.
    • £35.00
    Bedfordshire is one of the smallest English counties but encompasses great variety in landscape and architecture. Its major monument is Woburn Abbey, one of the finest Georgian country houses in England, and the influence of the estate is widely felt in the model housing and schools in the county's villages. Its many other attractions range from the churches of the market towns of Bedford, Leighton Buzzard, and Ampthill to the majestic gardens at Wrest Park. Such variety is also to be found in Huntingdonshire and Peterborough, famous not only for the cathedral and the spires of the stone medieval parish churches scattered across its remote and intimate landscape but also for vast and stately Burghley House and Vanbrugh's Kimbolton Castle. This a fully revised edition of Pevsner's original guide of 1968 and contains separate introductions, gazetteers, and photographs for Bedfordshire, Huntingdonshire, and Peterborough.
    Simon Bradley
    • £35.00
    This is the essential companion to the architecture of Cambridgeshire, fully revised for the first time in sixty years and featuring superb new photography. Half of the book is devoted to the famous university city, with its astonishingly rich and varied inheritance of college buildings including striking post-war additions. A combination of boldness and innovation may be found at Ely Cathedral, one of the greatest achievements of English medieval design. By comparison, the rest of the county remains surprisingly little known. Its largely unspoiled landscapes vary from the northern flat fen country to the rolling chalk uplands of the south and east; its architecture encompasses rewarding village churches, distinctive vernacular building in timber, stone, and brick, the former monastic sites at Denny and Anglesey, and the magnificent aristocratic seat of Wimpole Hall.
    Henry Plummer
    • £18.00
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    This book celebrates established icons, newly discovered gems and contemporary masterworks that represent the highest expression of Scandinavian design and response to their environment. Fifty projects are featured in detail, ordered according to the way in which different light conditions have imparted particular qualities on the buildings. Henry Plummer treats his subject from a uniquely authoritative perspective in which his words resonate directly with his artfully taken images. Books that give a true sense of the magical light that have shaped great buildings are rare: this is a publication to savour.