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The Baillie Gifford Prize 2017 highlighted the best non-fiction books written in the English language over this incredible year. From the arts and science to biographies, autobiographies, history, politics and more, our fascinating selection is full of compelling non-fiction - including David France's 2017 winner How to Survive a Plague: The Story of How Activists and Scientists Tamed AIDS.

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The Baillie Gifford Prize 2017

The Baillie Gifford Prize 2017 highlighted the best non-fiction books written in the English language over this incredible year. From the arts and science to biographies, autobiographies, history, politics and more, our fascinating selection is full of compelling non-fiction - including David France's 2017 winner How to Survive a Plague: The Story of How Activists and Scientists Tamed AIDS.

  • Mr Lear

    Jenny Uglow

    Product Code: BJBHO
    Hardback
    Edward Lear's poems follow and break the rules. They abide by the logic of syntax, the linking of rhyme and the dance of rhythm, and these "Nonsenses" are full of joy - yet set against darkness. Where do these human-like animals and birds and these odd adventures - some gentle, some violent, some musical, some wild - come from? His many drawings that accompany his verse are almost hyper-real, as if he wants to free the creatures from the page. They exist nowhere else in literature, springing only from Lear's imagination. Lear lived all his life on the borders of rules and structures, of disciplines and desires. He vowed to ignore politics yet trembled with passionate sympathies. He depended on patrons and moved in establishment circles, yet he never belonged among them and mocked imperial attitudes. He loved men yet dreamed of marriage - but remained, it seems, celibate, wrapped in himself. Even in his family he was marginal, at once accepted and rejected. Surrounded by friends, he was alone. If we follow him across land and sea - to Italy, Greece and Albania, to The Levant and Egypt and India - and to the borderlands of spirit and self, art and desire, can we see, in the end, if the nonsense makes sense? This is what Jenny Uglow has set sail to find out.
    • £20.00
    • RRP £25.00
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  • How to Survive a Plague

    David France

    Product Code: BIBBT
    Paperback
    The riveting, powerful and profoundly moving story of the AIDS epidemic and the grass-roots movement of activists, many of them facing their own life-or-death struggles, who grabbed the reins of scientific research to help develop the drugs that turned HIV from a mostly fatal infection to a manageable disease. Around the globe, the 15.8 million people taking anti-AIDS drugs today are alive thanks to their efforts. Not since the publication of Randy Shilts's now classic And the Band Played On in 1987 has a book sought to measure the AIDS plague in such brutally human, intimate, and soaring terms. Weaving together the stories of dozens of individuals, this is an insider's account of a pivotal moment in our history and one that changed the way that medical science is practiced worldwide.
    • £10.39
    • RRP £12.99
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  • Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race

    Reni Eddo-Lodge

    Product Code: BCWES
    Hardback
    (1)
    Reni Eddo-Lodge's award-winning first book is a must-have handbook for anyone looking to understand race relations in Britain today.

    In 2014, journalist Reni Eddo-Lodge wrote a blog piece entitled 'Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race' and her powerful words went viral. She received floods of comments from people desperate to speak up about their experiences with race in Britain, causing her to open the discussion and to dig into the sources of these feeling.

    Exploring issues from eradicated black history to the political purpose of white dominance, whitewashed feminism to the inextricable link between class and race, Reni Eddo-Lodge offers a timely and essential new framework for how to see, acknowledge and counter racism.
    • £13.59
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  • Plot 29

    Allan Jenkins

    Product Code: AXLTO
    Hardback
    'When I am disturbed, even angry, gardening has been a therapy. When I don't want to talk I turn to Plot 29, or to a wilder piece of land by a northern sea. There, among seeds and trees, my breathing slows; my heart rate too. My anxieties slip away.' As a young boy in 1960s Plymouth, Allan Jenkins and his brother, Christopher, were rescued from their care home and fostered by an elderly couple. There, the brothers started to grow flowers in their riverside cottage. They found a new life with their new mum and dad. As Allan grew older, his foster parents were never quite able to provide the family he and his brother needed, but the solace he found in tending a small London allotment echoed the childhood moments when he grew nasturtiums from seed. Over the course of a year, Allan digs deeper into his past, seeking to learn more about his absent parents. Examining the truths and untruths that he'd been told, he discovers the secrets to why the two boys were in care. What emerges is a vivid portrait of the violence and neglect that lay at the heart of his family. A beautifully written, haunting memoir, Plot 29 is a mystery story and meditation on nature and nurture. It's also a celebration of the joy to be found in sharing food and flowers with people you love.
    • £12.39
    • RRP £14.99
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