History Books

  • TYCH
    Dixe Wills
    • £4.99
    • RRP £16.99
    • Save £12.00
    Dixe Wills, the author of Tiny Islands and Tiny Stations, once again proves why small is beautiful with Tiny Churches.

    In his personal and quirky style, he looks at 60 of the nation's most perfect diminutive churches and explains how you can get to each one via public transport. Each church is so tiny, that only about 30 people could fit comfortably inside!

    Representing a unique slice of British local history and attitude, Dixe looks at how the tiny churches have survived and thrived throughout history. He celebrates the fact that they now retain the atmosphere and beauty of when they were first built.
  • BGHI
    • £9.99
    • RRP £25.00
    • Save £15.01
    With stunning visual timelines and special CGI reconstructions, this huge book from DK shows you history's greatest events in ways you have never seen before.

    Taking you from the formation of the universe right up to the present day, the brilliantly illustrated book looks at the major events that have changed the course of life on Earth. Bringing together a range of perspectives, it's a celebration of the human race's incredible journey.

    Containing a foreword from Professor David Christian, whose Big History TED talk had over 5 million views, this huge book will help you not only understand how and why we got where we are today, but also how we should view our place in history. It's aligned with Bill Gates' online Big History Project.
  • Revolution - Hardback - 9780230706422 - Peter Ackroyd
    Peter Ackroyd
    • £6.00
    • RRP £25.00
    • Save £19.00
    Peter Ackroyd presents the latest instalment in his History of England with Revolution, a book covering the years between 1688 and 1815.

    From William of Orange's accession following the Revolution to the Regency when England once again found itself at war with France (a war that ended with the defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo), this looks at life during the late Stuart and Georgian eras.

    During this time, the Bank of England and stock exchange were founded and the Church of England was fully established as the guardian of the spiritual life of the nation. Newspapers also first flourished during this era and the English novel was born. It was also a time when coffee houses, playhouses and shops began to pop up in towns and villages all across the nation.

    The industrial revolution also occurred in this period and this was a time when England transformed from a country of blue skies and farmland to one of soot and steel and coal.
  • MPWR
    Jeremy Black
    • £10.99
    • RRP £30.00
    • Save £19.01
    A very poignant and powerful book, Maps of War is a visual survey of how conflict was recorded and planned. It uses archive maps to reveal how warfare and documentation has changed through the centuries.

    Covering the history of military mapping, the book looks at beginning and what impact the invention of printing and introduction of gunpowder had. In the 17th century, military commanders and strategists started to document wars by way of illustration.

    In the 18th century, they started to use maps to chart progress. This chapter reflects the spread of European power and transoceanic conflict and focuses on the American war of Independence. The book then moves on to the 19th and 20th centuries, covering everything from the American Civil War to the World War, Vietnam and the Gulf Wars.
  • Terry Deary's Dangerous Days Collection - 3 Books - Collection - 9781407250625 - Terry Deary
    • £4.00
    • RRP £25.97
    • Save £21.97
    • Just £1.33 per book
    With his dark sense of humour and accessible writing style, Terry Deary is one of the nation's favourite children's authors.

    Here, he takes the traits which have helped make his Horrible Histories books so popular to introduce adults to the most shocking secrets of the Roman Empire, Elizabethan England and the Victorian Railways.

    From how the Romans (the first 'civilised' society, remember...) made human killing a sport to the lack of safety on the rails, there are so many shocking facts to absorb and gasp over...
  • BNHS
    Paul Brown
    • £6.99
    • RRP £20.00
    • Save £13.01
    Passionately written by Paul Brown, this lavish book explores 20 of the most celebrated and accessible ships in Britain and explains how they have helped to shape the nation.

    Britain has a long and rich seafaring history that stretches right back to the time of Drake and Nelson. Although much of this is recorded in literature and in museums, there's nothing better than looking at the preserved and restored monuments to discover their true past.

    Presented in order of each ship's launch date, each entry is written by the acknowledged expert on a particular vessel, giving full specification details. The book is also sumptuously illustrated with contemporary photographs, historical illustrations and a full set of scale plans.

    Among the vessels featured at the Mary Rose, HMS Victory and the Cutty Sark.
  • 1666: Plague, War & Hellfire - Hardback - 9781473623538 - Rebecca Rideal
    Rebecca Rideal
    • £4.00
    • RRP £20.00
    • Save £16.00
    From the Great Fire of London to the plague and the Second Dutch War, this fascinating book from historian Rebecca Rideal provides a narrative history of the year 1666.

    Presented in beautiful hardback and based on original archive research, it looks at how these events struck the country and their lasting effects. Rideal also uses little-known sources to provide an eye-opening account of what happened during these 12 months - a period often seen as a turning point in English history.

    Despite the devastation, there were also many significant cultural and scientific feats taking place - John Milton completed Paradise Lost; Christopher Wren proposed his plan for a new London after the Fire; and Isaac Newton discovered gravity.
  • Imperial War Museum's History Collection - 3 Books - Collection - 9781471162497
    • £5.99
    • RRP £24.97
    • Save £18.98
    • Just £2.00 per book
    Published in conjunction with the Imperial War Museum, this three-book collection brings together a fascinating and authoritative social history of the Second World War.

    A Prayer for Gallipoli covers the Great War from the point of view of a chaplain. Kenneth Best had no military training, so to fulfil his pastoral role, he had to get close to the front line and work with troops as they were under fire. As his empathy for the troops grew larger, he became more and more disgusted with their leaders. These diaries provide an insight into the horrific realities of trench warfare.

    The Secret History of the Blitz by Joshua Levine looks at the people that are not normally mentioned during accounts of the War - those spivs, outcasts and unsung heroes who were in the shadows; and D-Day to Victory features the diaries of a British tank commander as the war finally came to an end.

    All written using archive and primary sources, these are candid and compelling reads about the triumphs and tragedies of war.
  • QBEE
    Sian Evans
    • £4.99
    • RRP £20.00
    • Save £15.01
    Written with humour and style by Sian Evans, Queen Bees is a book that looks at the lives of six remarkable society hostesses and the powerful impact they made on social history.

    The women covered in the book are Lady Astor, who went on to become the first female MP, Mrs Greville, who cultivated a relationship with Edward VII, and Lady Londonderry, Lady Cunard, Laura Corrigan and Lady Colefax.

    During the aftermath of the First World War, the previously strict hierarchies of the British class system had been weakened and a number of ambitious women had made sure it was their time. Taking their place at the top of society as great hostesses, they ruled over London from their dining tables and salons, entertaining all kinds of powerful people and celebrities.

    This is the story of a form of societal revolution, and the extraordinary women who helped it happen. Extraordinary women whose influence can still be felt today.
  • FLSA
    Peter Ginn
    • £8.99
    • RRP £25.00
    • Save £16.01
    Accompanying a BBC Two series, Full Steam Ahead: How the Railways Made Britain provides a glorious insight into life in the country during the Industrial Revolution of the late 19th and early 20th century - using rail transportation as the backdrop to the changes in social attitudes and culture that occurred.

    Revealing just how much of today's world was shaped by the rail network, authors Peter Ginn and Ruth Goodman chart the evolution of railways and reveals the stories of the men, women and children who built many of the tracks and trains. They also explore how the railway impacted everything from food and medicine to warfare and the class system.

    Covering the rise of the working class, women's rights, industrial growth and economic decline, this illustrated book provides an insight into one of the key periods of Britain's social history.
  • NAGH
    Keith Jeffery
    • £4.99
    • RRP £9.99
    • Save £5.00
    In this eye-opening book, Keith Jeffery looks at how the events of the First World War affected the rest of the world.

    Covering the 12 months of 1916, he picks out 12 key moments and reveals the impact they had on the rest of the world. As well as famous battles including Gallipoli and the Somme, the author also examines the Easter Rising, the Italian Front and the killing of Rasputin and explains how all of these related to the War.

    Thoroughly researched using a host of military, social and cultural sources, this book looks at just how much the war dramatically altered the state of so many nations.
  • Neil Oliver's History Collection - 3 Books - Collection - 9781407250502 - Neil Oliver
    • £5.99
    • RRP £29.97
    • Save £23.98
    • Just £2.00 per book
    A knowledgeable and popular historian, Neil Oliver reveals the history of the Vikings, Ancient Britain and his native Scotland in this incredibly informative and entertaining three-book collection.

    All based around his popular BBC documentaries, the books are passionately written and will delight any armchair historian. In Vikings, he goes beyond their bloody reputation to discover the truth about them and how they managed to build an empire that lasted nearly 200 years.

    In A History of Ancient Britain, Neil looks at half a million years of human history, taking in everything from Ice Ages to the departure of the Roman Empire in the 5th Century AD. A History of Scotland looks at one of the oldest countries in the world's diverse past and how the tales of failure, submission, thwarted ambition and tragedy often badly serve this great nation and focuses on the rich tapestry of its intricate past. It perfectly captures the essence of Scotland and its place and standing in the world.
  • Classic World War II Aircraft Cutaways - Hardback - 9780753731178
    • £5.00
    • RRP £19.99
    • Save £14.99
    With cross-section drawings taken direct from the official Flight and The Aeroplane archives, Classic World War II: Aircraft Cutaways is a must for anyone interested in history and aeronautical engineering.

    Alongside each of the illustrations is some detailed text for each type of aircraft. It covers the history and evaluates the drawing. There are even 12 vehicles displayed on pull-out, double-page gatefolds!

    Telling you everything you could ever want to know about the planes that flew during the Second World War, this keepsake book also features archive photography Aeroplane Montly.
  • THYB
    • £6.99
    • RRP £16.99
    • Save £10.00
    This DK book will take you on a visual exploration of the world's past and will entertain and inform everyone from avid students to armchair historians.

    Spanning from the first humans arriving in Australia around 45,000 years ago to the modern world as we know it, the book is written in plain, accessible English and gives short and pithy explanations for all the events that have shaped our world.

    It also features step-by-step diagrams to help you untangle knotty concepts and witty illustrations that play with our ideas about our past. From revolutions to changes in civilisations and advancements in technology, it reveals just how much our world has changed over the years.
  • Mapping the Roads - Hardback - 9780749574352 - Mike Parker
    Mike Parker
    • £6.50
    • RRP £25.00
    • Save £18.50
    Covering Britain's road development, Mike Parker's Mapping the Roads is a fascinating true-life story that also explores the country's political, economical and social history.

    The car has helped shape Britain's landscape, changed our maps and nowadays our lifestyle depends very much on our roads - from getting from A to B to distribution and much more. Although perhaps now taken for granted, the building of roads was once seen as a glorious advancement, with Britain's motorways being seen as 'the cathedrals of the modern world'.

    This intriguing and extensive book from The AA charts the ambitions and hopes of the nation through our maps, from the old ways through to our motorways, complete with distinct and colourful cartography.
  • SMME
    Robert J. Kershaw
    • £6.99
    • RRP £20.00
    • Save £13.01
    Written by former para and colonel Robert J. Kershaw, 24 Hrs at the Somme provides a definitive account of the battle that changed history and left a huge emotional impact on the British public.

    It's now 100 years since the battle but it still remains one of the most important and devastating moments in military history with 57,470 men ending up dead, missing or wounded. In this detailed and informative book, Kershaw uses the voices of British and German soldiers who lived through the awful day to reveal exactly what happened.

    Juxtaposing the view of the British trenches with that from the German parapet, the book draws on eyewitness accounts, memories and letters to expose the true horror of 1 July, 1916. Amongst the horrifying accounts of warfare there are also poignant stories of humanity, comradeship and patriotic spirit.
  • GLBE
    Catharine Arnold
    • £6.99
    • RRP £16.99
    • Save £10.00
    A compelling portrait of both William Shakespeare and the history of London during his lifetime, this book reveals just how much the Bard's life was affected by the great city.

    From triumphs including the opening of the Globe playhouse in 1599 to the tragic lives of Shakespeare's contemporaries and the ever-present threat of riots, rebellions and even the plague, this book covers a fascinating era in London's history.

    An acclaimed historian, Catharine Arnold also reveals how acting came of age during Shakespeare's lifetime. Using his own plays and contemporary sources, this is a unique and revealing insight into the development of both London and English theatre.
  • MRSR
    Geoff Tibballs
    • £2.99
    • RRP £9.99
    • Save £7.00
    Rev yourself up for some of the most extraordinary true tales from the world of motor racing.

    Part of the bestselling Strangest series, this book goes all the way back to 1894 when motor racing's colourful history began with a bang. From the Frenchman who drove 25 miles in reverse to the Grand Prix when the leaders were so far ahead they stopped for a meal in the pits, this is a compendium of bizarre, fascinating and fast-paced facts.

    Very funny, this is a great gift for petrolheads of all ages.
  • HLVC
    Kevin Sampson
    • £5.99
    • RRP £12.99
    • Save £7.00
    On 15 April 1989, the world witnessed one of the worst football disasters occur at the Hillsborough Stadium in Sheffield. 96 people were crushed to death and another 766 injured in a tragedy that was later admitted to have been exacerbated by police failures.

    Written by Kevin Sampson - a man who was actually in the stands on that fateful day and who has close connections with the Justice campaign - this book contains exhaustive and exclusive interviews with people who have become familiar public figures and many who are telling their heart-rending stories for the first time.

    From the tragic events of the day itself to the shocking aftermath that has taken years to resolve, this book interweaves the views of the people who were there with the families and friends of those who died, along with the observations of the people who played key roles in the long search for the truth.
  • RIGB
    Lyn Rigby
    • £4.99
    • RRP £16.99
    • Save £12.00
    The mother of soldier Lee Rigby, who was murdered in Woolwich in May 2013, tells a personal story of grief and love for the son she lost.

    Although she has questions for the government and military, this is a tribute to a young father whose future was so cruelly taken away.
  • Standfords Travel Classics Collection - 3 Books - Collection - 9781909612860
    • £4.99
    • RRP £21.97
    • Save £16.98
    • Just £1.66 per book
    With books from Captain Joshua Slocum, Robert Louis Stevenson and Edith Wharton, this collection features some of the finest historical travel writing of all time.

    Edith Wharton, the author of The Age of Innocence, travelled to Morocco in the final days of the First World War. A time before guidebooks, she recorded her encounters with the country's people, traditions and ceremonies and described the mosques, palaces and ruins she visited in In Morocco. Very observant and brimming with passion, her work will transport you to another era.

    Captain Joshua Slocum sailed the world for over 35 years and embarked on the first solo circumnavigation of the globe. For more than three years, he battled stormy seas, attacks from raiders and loneliness and in Sailing Alone Around the World, he documented it all. Travels with a Donkey in Cevennes is Robert Louis Stevenson's humorous and heart-warming memoirs of a walking trip (with a donley named Modestine) he took in his early 20s.

    This is an eye-opening collection for people interested in travel, history and classic authors.
  • TICR
    Andrew Davidson
    • £5.99
    • RRP £20.00
    • Save £14.01
    Told through a series of letters and thoroughly researched analysis, Andrew Davidson's The Invisible Cross tells the incredible true story of Colonel Graham Chaplin, a frontline officer who spent three years in the trenches during the First World War.

    The commander of the Cameron Highlanders, Colonel Chaplin sent letters from the trenches to his new wife on an almost-daily basis. He was so keen to let her know how he was doing that if he didn't have time to write a letter, he would send a postcard to assure her he was 'quite well'.

    Providing a personal insight into how a serving officer felt during time of conflict, the letters reveal his worries about his men and the family he's left behind as well as his observations on how the war is actually going. They also reveal why a man who was so trusted and respected by his men wasn't promoted out of the trenches until 1917, despite the fact all his contemporaries were...

    Startling from the very first page, the non-fiction book offers a portrait of what life was like on the Western Front and also touches upon Colonel Chaplin's encounters with the likes of Robert Graves, Bernard Montgomery and Siegfried Sassoon.
  • KGJN
    • £6.99
    • RRP £25.00
    • Save £18.01
    The 800th anniversary of Magna Carta made headlines across the world in 2015 and this biography provides a compelling portrait of King John, the supposed tyrant leader who issued - and consequently rejected - the famous document that bound him and his successors to better behaviour.

    Extensively researched and written by Marc Morris, author of A Great and Terrible King and The Norman Conquest, the book examines whether King John was the familiar figure we all know from Robin Hood - a monarch who was greedy, cowardly, despicable and cruel.

    Throughout the book, the historian draws on contemporary chronicles and the king's own letters to show what John was really like. He argues he was dynamic, inventive and relentless, but also a very flawed individual whose rise to power involved treachery, rebellion and murder.

    The book also looks at the invasions by Wales, Scotland and Ireland that occurred under John's reign and the civil war and foreign invasion that brought upon his downfall.
  • RELM
    Dan Jones
    • £6.99
    • RRP £20.00
    • Save £13.01
    Written by Dan Jones, the bestselling author of The Plantagenets, Realm Divided outlines events during one transformative year of the thirteenth century.

    An astonishing read for anyone interested in history, it will show you exactly what happened in 1215 - the year when King John agreed to pace his seal on the Magna Carta. An event that set England on its slow march towards a fully representative democracy, this was also the year that the Capetians began to show their dominance in France and that Pope Innocent III's Fourth Lateran Council decisions affected the lives of millions.

    From royal court to peasant wedding, this book provides an accessible portrait of medieval English society.