User Heart Menu Basket Cross Plus < Minus <

Sorry, we are no longer taking orders

Our priority is to fulfil all existing orders whilst ensuring the health and wellbeing of our colleagues and customers alike. Please be assured that our warehouse team is working hard to ship all existing orders as quickly and safely as possible. Orders may take up to 7 weeks to be delivered.

Unfortunately you can no longer log into your account, but please do not worry. This does not mean your order is not being processed. You will receive a tracking email as soon as your order has been dispatched. You are still able to contact Customer Services by email at contact_centre@thebookpeople.co.uk or call 0345 602 3030 (Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm) for any questions you may have.

Thank you for your continued patience and understanding. The Book People

Books by Andrew Cole

  • Class 26, 27 and 33 Locomotives

    Andrew Cole

    Product Code: BXHOA
    Paperback
    The 1955 British Rail Modernisation Plan identified a need for small, lightweight diesel locomotives and the Birmingham Railway Carriage & Wagon Company, based in Smethwick in the West Midlands, was awarded the contract to build the Class 26, Class 27 and Class 33 locomotives. All were built with Sulzer engines, and the Class 26 and 27 locomotives were split between the Scottish, Eastern and Midland regions, before being concentrated north of the border. The Class 33 locomotives were built for the Southern Region. All three classes were comfortable on freight as well as passenger turns. The locomotives were built to last, with the Class 27s the first to be completely withdrawn in 1987 and the last Class 26 taken out of service in 1993. Some Class 33 locomotives remain active on the main line. This book shows the three different classes at work and on shed, and also covers the classes into preservation.
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
    • Save £3.00
    More info More info
  • Class 90 Locomotives

    Andrew Cole

    Product Code: BRNGQ
    Paperback
    In 1987 British Rail decided it needed a new class of AC electric locomotive for use on the West Coast Main Line. The idea was that this class would help eliminate the Class 85 locomotives and would be used on both freight and passenger workings. Fifty members of the class were built at Crewe Works, alongside the Class 91 locomotives that were built for the East Coast Main Line. The Class 90s were designed to be able to work with a Mk 3 DVT, which also eliminated the need to run round at terminal stations. The first twenty-five members were delivered in InterCity Swallow livery, the following eleven in InterCity Mainline livery, allowing them to be used on passenger and freight workings, with the final fourteen members delivered in Railfreight Speedlink livery being predominantly freight locomotives. Most of the class are still in use today, with fifteen still used on passenger workings out of Norwich and the remainder in use with DB Cargo or Freightliner. This book tells the story of the Class 90s.
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
    • Save £3.00
    More info More info
  • Class 91 Locomotives

    Andrew Cole

    Product Code: BQYQS
    Paperback
    British Rail introduced thirty-one Class 91 locomotives from 1989 onwards. They were built at Crewe Works for use on passenger services on the East Coast main line out of London Kings Cross. They were designed with a sleek cab at the one end, while the other end was fitted with a blunt cab, as it was envisaged that they would work parcels and freight traffic overnight, thus not requiring the high-speed running. With their maximum speed of 140mph/225 km/h, they became known as the InterCity 225s. 91110 currently holds the speed record for a British locomotive, and carries a commemorative plaque. The Class 91s have served the East Coast for nearly thirty years, and this book looks at their careers from the start. There have been a couple of high-profile accidents and incidents involving the class, but all are still in use today. There have been many different operators of the class, and this book sets out to chart the different liveries, and also one-off special liveries carried by the class. The end is in sight for this class of locomotive on the East Coast, with the introduction of the Virgin Trains Class 800 Azuma units, but hopefully a use can be found for these distinctive looking and sounding electric locomotives.
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
    • Save £3.00
    More info More info
  • Saltley Depot

    Andrew Cole

    Product Code: BQDDQ
    Paperback
    The very first depot at Saltley was opened by the Midland Railway in 1854. Due to the fast-growing levels of traffic, the depot was to prove inadequate, and it was relocated near to Lawley Street, where it remained until closure. With three massive roundhouses, Saltley was one of the largest depots in the West Midlands, servicing freight and passenger locomotives around Birmingham. With the end of steam in the late 1960s, the depot was no longer fit for purpose, and the majority of it was demolished to make way for a three-road diesel shed, with the depot now becoming a locomotive inspection point. As in the steam days, the depot proved to be an extremely busy and well-used location in diesel times, with locomotives visiting from all parts of the country. This book aims to show the many different types of locomotives that found their way to the depot, from the 1960s until its final closure in the mid-2000s.
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
    • Save £3.00
    More info More info
  • Rail Rover: West Midlands Ranger

    Andrew Cole

    Product Code: BPMEX
    Paperback
    This is a photographic tribute to the West Midlands Day Ranger, aiming to show how times have changed over the years in the West Midlands and surrounding areas. The area covered in this volume stretches from Crewe in the north, down to Northampton in the south. Also covered are the lines across to Hereford in the west, and as far east as Nuneaton. There is a fascinating variety of traction that is covered in this volume - both loco-hauled as well as the multiple unit variety. The scenes are dated from the mid-1980s through to present day. Although not an in-depth, technical account of the traction involved, it aims to show the array on offer, from then and now, and also just how much the traffic has changed.
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
    • Save £3.00
    More info More info
  • West Midlands PTE and Its Successors

    Andrew Cole

    Product Code: BKKYI
    Paperback
    Andrew Cole takes us on a journey of West Midlands Passenger Transport Executive, or WMPTE, buses, and those used by its successors. WMPTE came into being in 1969 and combined the bus fleets of Birmingham, West Bromwich, Walsall and Wolverhampton, with Coventry joining later on. They also took over part of the Midland Red operations, with their buses transferring to WMPTE ownership. WMPTE chose to adopt a livery similar to the one used by the largest of its inherited fleets, Birmingham City Transport's blue and cream. They operated services throughout the West Midlands, having one of the largest fleets in the UK. Upon deregulation in 1986, WMPTE became known as West Midlands Travel, who quickly adopted a blue-and-silver livery. West Midlands Travel would eventually undergo a management buyout in 1991 before being sold to the National Express Group in 1995, who changed the name to Travel West Midlands. WMPTE tended to standardize its fleet of buses, taking many Daimler and Leyland built Fleetlines before adopting locally built MCW Metrobuses as their main double-decker. All of these buses have now been withdrawn from service, leaving a very modern fleet operating in the West Midlands.
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
    • Save £3.00
    More info More info
  • BR Blue in the 1970s and 1980s

    Andrew Cole

    Product Code: BIAEF
    Paperback
    The 1970s were a decade of consolidation for British Rail as the company fought against the rise in the use of motor transport, both for passenger and freight purposes. Steam traction had finally been eradicated during the late 1960s and British Rail adopted a new image - a livery of all-over blue, with multiple units and coaching stock carrying blue and grey. During this time, British Rail also adopted the TOPS numbering system, whereby all locomotives were renumbered using a five-digit code and losing the earlier prefix numbers. The blue livery was applied to nearly every locomotive that was used on the network, from the humble shunter right through to the fast express electric locomotives. There were a few notable exceptions including No. 40106, which was the last locomotive to carry the green livery and was repainted to commemorate the fact. The new corporate image was designed to bring a fresh new image to British Rail, and combined with the introduction of the High Speed Train heralded a change in the companies fortunes. This collection of photographs shows British Rail during this difficult period and includes photographs from the 1970s through to the mid-1980s.
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
    • Save £3.00
    More info More info
  • First Generation DMUs

    Andrew Cole

    Product Code: BGSPW
    Paperback
    In the 1950s, British Railways set upon the Modernisation Plan, which would set out the way British Rail would operate in the future. It was decided to replace steam with diesel, and so the idea of the Diesel Multiple Unit was born. From the mid-1950s onwards, thousands of power and trailer cars were built at various different places, from BR workshops to private manufacturers. All were given different class numbers, which ranged from the Class 100 to the Class 131. By far the most numerous class were the 101s, built by Metro-Cammell in Birmingham, with over 600 cars built. The multiple units helped eradicate steam, and also provided a low-cost operation for lightly loaded branch lines. A large number of the different classes would lead long lives, in particular the Class 101s and Class 108s, which were built at Derby. Some units gave nearly fifty years service, and most carried BR green livery, followed by BR blue and finally BR blue and grey. Upon sectorisation, many different liveries started to appear. The final first generation multiple units were taken out of service in 2003, apart from one or two that came back into use with Chiltern Railways and Arriva Trains Wales, and a large number have entered preservation, being ideal for days that are lightly loaded.
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
    • Save £3.00
    More info More info
  • Loadhaul, Mainline and Transrail Livery

    Andrew Cole

    Product Code: BGMQZ
    Paperback
    Loadhaul, Mainline and Transrail were formed in 1994, when British Rail decided to concentrate its freight operations in the three companies. BR decided to split the country into three regions, with Loadhaul in the North East, Transrail to the West, and Mainline to the South and East. The three companies would only have a short life span, as they were all brought together by Wisconsin Central, who renamed them all as EWS. The liveries of the three companies were very different, with Loadhaul being all-over black with orange cabsides. Transrail never adopted a new livery; rather they just rebranded their locomotives, which still carried their previous liveries, the most common being the former Trainload freight triple grey. Mainline also rebranded most of their locomotives similar to Transrail, but they did also have a very striking aircraft blue and silver livery that started to grace the fleet. The three companies inherited most of the former Trainload freight locomotives, but also included were the Civil Engineers liveried locomotives. Here, Andrew Cole shows the different classes of locomotives that the three companies operated, both in traffic and also on the various depots that the companies operated from.
    • £13.09
    • RRP £14.99
    • Save £1.90
    More info More info
  • Class 08/09 Locomotives

    Andrew Cole

    Product Code: AXGXW
    Paperback
    The Class 08/09 were to become the main diesel shunter of the British Railways era. Just over a thousand were built from 1952 onwards at five different British Rail workshops over a ten-year period. Just about every corner of the UK would be home to one or more of these shunting locomotives. They were ideal for yard and depot shunting, and also acted as station pilots at nearly every major station. The main difference between the two classes was that the Class 09 had a different maximum speed, and most were also fitted with extra air pipes to work with Southern Region EMUs. With the constriction of UK freight workings, a lot of yards were taken out of use, and the trip workings that these locomotives performed soon ceased. With the advent of multiple unit trains, the need for them as station pilots also ceased. A large majority of the two classes have been withdrawn and scrapped, but a fair number still survive, doing what they were built for over fifty years ago. A large number have also entered preservation, and the classes have carried a multitude of different liveries over the years.
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
    • Save £3.00
    More info More info
  • Class 43 Locomotives

    Andrew Cole

    Product Code: AUKRQ
    Paperback
    The Class 43 locos were first constructed from 1975 onwards at Crewe Works. At the time the design was revolutionary, and it would go on to become the most iconic of British Rail locomotives. Their sleek design would become world famous, and when introduced they were known as the High Speed Train, or HST, due to their top speed of 125mph. 197 power cars were built, with the last into traffic in 1982. When built they were all fitted with the distinctive Paxman Valenta engine, but they have all been replaced with either Paxman VP185 or MTU engines. They have operated over all the former British Rail regions, although they were scarce on the Southern. Currently, it is mainly operated by Great Western, East Midlands Trains, Virgin Trains East Coast, Grand Central and Cross Country Trains. The Great Western and East Coast trains already have their replacements on order, and it remains to see how long they will remain in service. Only three power cars have been scrapped following high profile accidents,a testament to how well the design would stand the test of time.
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
    • Save £3.00
    More info More info

 2019 - The Book People Ltd. The Book People Ltd is registered in England. Company number 2290665. VAT Number: 664509028.
Registered address: The Book People Limited, Salisbury House, Weyside Park, Catteshall Lane, Godalming, Surrey, GU7 1XE.