User Heart Menu Basket

Books by Henry Buckton

  • Hampshire at War Through Time

    Henry Buckton

    Product Code: BWBTJ
    Paperback
    In the early hours of 6 June 1944 Allied troops landed on the coast of northern France. Located directly opposite the Normandy beaches, Hampshire would become the main springboard for Operation Overlord, the codename for the invasion of Europe. But in telling the story of Hampshire at War we go right back to the start of hostilities, on a geographical journey around many locations in the county that were somehow involved. This fascinating selection of photographs traces some of the many ways in which Hampshire has changed and developed since the war. Home of the Spitfire, Hampshire was one of our most active counties during the war. Here we explore the bombing of Portsmouth, Southampton as an embarkation area for D-Day, the naval provisions supplied by Gosport, the defences built to protect the country from invasion, the New Forest airfields, the role of Middle Wallop in the Battle of Britain, and much more.
    • £11.99
    • RRP £14.99
    • Save £3.00
    More info
  • Retreat

    Henry Buckton

    Product Code: BBBOL
    Paperback
    At around 7 p.m. on 26 May 1940, Prime Minister Winston Churchill gave the order for Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of British troops from the harbour and beaches of Dunkirk. The German forces that had attacked through the Netherlands, Belgium and the Ardennes into France on 10 May had rapidly driven to the English Channel, reaching the coast at Noyelles-sur-Mer on 20 May and trapping the BEF, French forces and the remnants of the Belgian army. BEF commander Lord Gort immediately began to plan for his forces to withdraw towards Dunkirk, the nearest location with good port facilities. Between 27 May and 4 June, ships from the Royal Navy, the Merchant Navy, France, Belgium and the Netherlands as well as the famous Little Ships evacuated almost 340,000 Allied troops from Dunkirk and brought them back to Britain. However, the Dunkirk evacuation was not the end. In Operation Cycle just over 11,000 Allied troops were evacuated from the port of Le Havre between 10 and 13 June. Later still, in Operation Ariel, another 190,000 troops and between 30,000 and 40,000 civilians would be evacuated between 15 and 25 June from ports along France's western coast including Brest, Saint-Nazaire and Bordeaux. This evacuation would see the greatest loss of life in a British ship when the Luftwaffe bombed and sank the troop ship Lancastria in the estuary of the Loire. In this book, author Henry Buckton examines the Dunkirk evacuation, the rapid German advance that led up to it and the evacuations that came after.
    • £15.19
    • RRP £18.99
    • Save £3.80
    More info
  • Devon at War Through Time

    Henry Buckton

    Product Code: AFONT
    Paperback
    During the Second World War Devon was reputedly the most militarized county in the country. This was particularly so just before D-Day when every town and village was bursting with American troops preparing to take part in the liberation of occupied Europe. But the story of Devon at War begins long before that and in this book we visit places that were affected at different stages of the conflict. We learn how Plymouth and Exeter experienced some of the most devastating air attacks outside London, while even smaller communities along the South Coast suffered from the shock tactics of tip and run raids. We see the crucial part that the county's ports and harbours played in keeping Britain's Navy afloat and at the forefront of operations. And perhaps most important of all, we acknowledge the county's incalculable contribution to all aspects of Operation Overlord, on land, at sea, or in the air. Of course every community has its own story to tell but it would be impossible to include them all. The examples chosen give a good summary of what took place in Devon during those dark days when the country as a whole was fighting for its very survival.
    • £14.89
    • RRP £14.99
    • Save £0.10
    More info