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Books by James Preston

  • Kent's Transport Heritage

    James Preston

    Product Code: BHZYS
    Paperback
    Kent is strategically located, lying on the approach to London and being the shortest route to and from continental Europe. As a result the evolution of the means of transport has left its mark. Roads were turnpike in the eighteenth century leaving toll houses, coaching inns, mile stones and bridges, while the motor car age saw the rise of filling stations. Kent claims the world's first all-steam-powered railway. After the railways spread their network of mainlines and branch lines they left a legacy of stations, signal boxes and goods sheds, as well as traces of where redundant lines have been lifted. Waterborne transport has also left a legacy in the form of canals and cuts, locks and bridges, along with sea ports, docks and wharves. Into the twentieth century new forms of transport such as aircraft led to the building of airports and hoverports which came and have largely departed. Kent's Transport Heritage outlines the changes taking place in these various aspects of transport and illustrates what remains extant.
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  • Kent's Industrial Heritage

    James Preston

    Product Code: AZLEW
    Paperback
    Kent is thought of as the 'Garden of England' and has been described as a county of 'hops, apples and cherries'. This may be true of a large part of the county, particularly after the Weald lost its important broadcloth and iron industries, but North Kent bordering the Thames and Medway became in the nineteenth century the most highly industrialised area of south-east England outside London. Kent, strategically located on the approach to London, had a long association with the armaments industries. It cast iron cannon from Tudor times to the early eighteenth century, provided the navy with warships from private and royal dockyards, and was an important manufacturer of gunpowder and explosives. It became a major supplier of paper to London stationers, and a source of millions of bricks and millions of tons of lime, cement, stone and sand for nineteenth century developments in London and overseas. To fill a demand created by these industries for machinery, an engineering sector developed which was at times at the cutting edge of technology. Barge building developed to exploit cheap water carriage of the county's products. Diversified farming provided the raw materials for a variety of agriculturally related activities including milling, tanning, malting and brewing. The book outlines the important place Kent industry held in the economy of southern England, and illustrates what remains extant in what is now essentially a post-industrial era.
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