Paul Anthony Jones Books & Bio. Cheap Books by Paul Anthony Jones. Book People

Books by Paul Anthony Jones

  • AVKQY
    • £11.29
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    How well do you know your words?; Buxom used to mean obedient; A cloud was a rock; Raunchy originally meant dirty; Brimming with hidden histories and tantalising twists, The Accidental Dictionary tells the extraordinary stories behind ordinary words.; Our everyday language is full of surprises; its origins are stranger than you might think. Any word might be knocked and buffeted, subjected to twists and turns, expansions and contractions, happy and unhappy accidents. There are intriguing tales behind even the most familiar terms, and they can say as much about the present as they do the past.; Busking, for instance, originally meant piracy. Grin meant to snarl. A bimbo was a man, nice meant ignorant, glamour was magic and a cupboard was a table ...; Focusing on 100 surprising threads in the evolution of English, The Accidental Dictionary reveals the etymological origins and quirky developments that have led to the meanings we take for granted today. It is a weird and wonderful journey into words.; So, let's revel in its randomness and delight in its diversity - our dictionary is indeed accidental.
  • BSMUZ
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    'Brilliant for anyone interested in the effervescent oddness of English' --Stig Abell on Word Drops What makes a place so memorable that it survives for ever in a word? In this captivating round-the-world jaunt, Paul Anthony Jones reveals the intriguing tales behind how 80 different places came to be immortalised in our language. Beginning in London and heading through Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, the Americas, then back to London again, each chapter leads into the next like a travelogue. As well as the origins of turkeys, brazil nuts, limericks and Panama hats, there's the story of how a small Czech village gave us the word dollar; how a tiny hamlet in Nottinghamshire became Gotham City; how an island with more bears than people gave us hooch; and how Stellenbosch, a South African town, became a verb meaning to demote someone on the sly. Our dictionaries are full of hidden histories, tales and adventures from all over the world - if you know where to look. Beautifully designed, consistently entertaining and ideal for dipping into, Around the World in 80 Words is the perfect gift: a whimsical voyage through the far-flung reaches of the English language.
  • BXZDD
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    If you're logofascinated, you are literally spellbound by language.; This surprising compendium of 1,000 facts about words, language and etymology is here to inspire your curiosity and delight in discovery. In Word Drops, you can delve into a smattering of unexpected connections and weird juxtapositions, stumble upon a new or remarkable word, or learn of many a bizarre etymological quirk or tall tale.; - Did you know that the bowl made by cupping your hands together is called a gowpen?; - And speaking of bowls, the earliest known reference to bowling in English dates from 1555, when bowling alleys were banned by an Act of Parliament.; - And that ties in nicely with the fact that the English called the Germans 'Alleymen' during the First World War.; - But in Navajo, Germany is called Beesh Bich'ahii Bikeyah-or 'metal cap-wearer land'.; Word Drops is a language fact book unlike any other, its linguistic tidbits all falling together into one long interconnected chain just like the example above with each fact neatly 'dropping' into place beside the next.; What's more, throughout, footnotes are used to give some informative and intriguing background to some of the most bizarre facts, covering everything from traditional Inuit games to the origin of the Bellini cocktail, from the precise length of one 'jiffy' to what the Romans thought hoopoe birds ate, and from what to expect on a night out with Dr Johnson to Samuel Pepys's cure for a hangover. Want to know the longest palindrome in Morse code, or who The Great Masticator was? Curious to know what Norwegian steam is, or what a jaaaar is? The answers are all here.; For all of the logofascinated among us, this is an immensely pleasurable and unpredictable collection that is guaranteed to raise eyebrows (the literal meaning, incidentally, of supercilious).
  • BXZDE
    • £7.19
    • RRP £8.99
    • Save £1.80Save 20%
    How well do you know your words?; Buxom used to mean obedient; A cloud was a rock; Raunchy originally meant dirty; Brimming with hidden histories and tantalising twists, The Accidental Dictionary tells the extraordinary stories behind ordinary words.; Our everyday language is full of surprises; its origins are stranger than you might think. Any word might be knocked and buffeted, subjected to twists and turns, expansions and contractions, happy and unhappy accidents. There are intriguing tales behind even the most familiar terms, and they can say as much about the present as they do the past.; Busking, for instance, originally meant piracy. Grin meant to snarl. A bimbo was a man, nice meant ignorant, glamour was magic and a cupboard was a table...; Focusing on 100 surprising threads in the evolution of English, The Accidental Dictionary reveals the etymological origins and quirky developments that have led to the meanings we take for granted today. It is a weird and wonderful journey into words.; So, let's revel in its randomness and delight in its diversity - our dictionary is indeed accidental.
  • BXZDF
    • £7.99
    • RRP £9.99
    • Save £2.00Save 20%
    The ultimate gift for wordsmiths and lovers of language: a word for every day of the year; Open the Cabinet to leap back in time, learn about linguistic trivia, follow a curious thread or wonder at the web of connections in the English language.; 1 January quaaltagh (n.) the first person you meet on New Year's Day; 1 April dorbellist (n.) a fool, a dull-witted dolt; 12 May word-grubber (n.) someone who uses obscure or difficult words in everyday conversation; 25 September theic (adj.) an excessive drinker of tea; 24 December doniferous (adj.) carrying a gift; Paul Anthony Jones has unearthed a wealth of strange and forgotten words: illuminating some aspect of the day, or simply telling a cracking good yarn, each reveals a story. Written with a light touch that belies the depth of research it contains, this is both a fascinating compendium of etymology and a captivating historical miscellany. Dip into this beautiful book to be delighted and intrigued throughout the year.